Talk:Sunglasses

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UV therapy in the 19th c[edit]

Finsen lamp-1900.jpg

It should maybe be noted in the history section that sunglasses were widely used by doctors and patients in the 19th century who participated in UV therapy. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Brianshapiro (talkcontribs) 01:56, 23 April 2014‎

Standards section error[edit]

Issue

The statement:

"There is no rating for transmittance protection for radiation of up to 400 nm ("UV400"), as required in other countries (incl. the United States) and recommended by experts."[10]

appears contradicted in the following paragraph, reading:

"The U.S. standard is ANSI Z80.3-2001, which includes three transmittance categories. According to the ANSI Z80.3-2001 standard, the lens should have a UVB (280 to 315 nm) transmittance of no more than one per cent and a UVA (315 to 380 nm) transmittance of no more than 0.3 times the visual light transmittance."

Solution

Rewrite the first quote as, "There is no rating for transmittance protection for radiation of up to 400 nm ("UV400"), as required in other countries and recommended by experts."[10] Nick Nardozzi (talk) 18:51, 23 November 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 23 December 2014[edit]

The wiki article has the following: "[1]"


http://wcbstv.com/seenon/UV.Rays.Sunglasses.2.234545.html is a dead link. I found the same article on another site. I request to replace it as the reference... the new url is @ http://purelife-glasses.com/100-uv-protection-sunglasses/

References

Harrisjohn107 (talk) 02:59, 23 December 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done: [1]. I have switched the two URLs. G S Palmer (talkcontribs) 16:50, 23 December 2014 (UTC)
Kde crystalsvg eraser.png Undone: if a link is dead, it's preferable to use an archive.org copy of the original source, rather than some copyvio on an affiliate-link spam blog that went up the same day as the edit request. I've dug out an archive.org copy and used that. --McGeddon (talk) 17:04, 23 December 2014 (UTC)
A good catch, and explanation of why you did it. Thanks! Reify-tech (talk) 18:27, 23 December 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 9 March 2015[edit]

With rising awareness of the Blue Light Threat from natural and artificial light sources, there is patented technology to effectively filter blue light. Based on the human body's own defenses, Melanin + Ocular Lens Pigment is an adjunct perfected by Dr. James Gallas, with global exclusivity provided to "TrueBlue Lenses". Although there are other lenses that claim to protect from blue light, the TrueBlue lens filters the blue light spectrum like no other lens for superior protection against veiled glare, benefiting the lens and retina of the eye. Sdinc (talk) 22:22, 9 March 2015 (UTC)

"Healthcare professionals recommend eye protection whenever the sun comes out[2] "[edit]

This claim seems dubious and is at best misleading: The effect would be that humans, despite being shaped by eons of evolution to walk in sunlight, should wear sunglasses half the time they step out the door. Either strike this sentence or give a more accurate description of what the consensus for what circumstances are. I note especially that "Healthcare professionals" means next to nothing: The plural requires no more than two individuals, there are many healthcare professionals who have very little qualification in general, and those who are qualified in general are not automatically experts on the topic at hand. Do we have a joint statement by dozens of world leading opticians and opthomologist or by two school nurses?80.226.24.9 (talk) 06:59, 27 August 2015 (UTC)

For the vast majority of those "eons" humans didn't live long enough for macular degeneration to show up. Evolution also failed to produce teeth that last past age 40 or so without modern dental care.
That said, the statement is strongly worded and gives a source with a passing reference to "experts". - SummerPhDv2.0 15:46, 27 August 2015 (UTC)
I've taken a shot at improving the statement and the source.[2] - SummerPhDv2.0 16:05, 27 August 2015 (UTC)