Talk:Superjudge

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"The album fared poorly commercially due to its release coinciding with the advent of the grunge era, which ultimately resulted in a dramatic decline in the popularity of heavy metal music in general." Wrong, wrong, WRONG!!! The album may have been a commercial disappointment, but it was NOT because it was released at a time when grunge was edging out old-school metal. Monster Magnet had far, far more in common with the "grunge" bands of the time than it did with the hair-metal and old-school metal bands that they displaced. Grunge was very heavily influenced by garage, psychedelia and punk, and that fit Monster Magnet to a T. 99.110.212.94 (talk) 23:03, 10 June 2010 (UTC)

I strongly disagree. MM was very much a part of the metal scene which was "dethroned" so to speak during the grunge alternative heyday of the 90s. Yes, they may have had something in common with some grunge bands of that era, but having lived through that period and buying Superjudge when it was first released, I can say that MM was definitely regarded as part of the "hair metal" scene in early 1993. As such, they were not at all regarded at that time as having anything at all to do with grunge or alternative. They were, sadly, regarded as a part of the old metal scene and not part of the new alternative scene. I believe the removed sentence was very much accurate. Freshfighter9talk 23:13, 10 June 2010 (UTC)

OK, anyone else want to throw in their two cents on this disagreement? You say one thing, I say another. Let me make my case that Monster Magnet had relatively more in common with the grunge bands of the time than with 80s hair metal.

- During the '80s, the time when "hair metal" and "old school heavy metal" were at their peak, Dave Wyndorf was NOT in a metal band. He was in a punk band called Shrapnel, which played shows at venues like the legendary punk club CBGB's.

- They did not release their very first records until 1990, when old-school metal was starting to wane and grunge had taken over the underground scene. And their first album did not come out until 1992, by which time grunge was fully muscling out old-style metal on the mainstream charts and radio.

- They associated more with grunge than with "old-school metal" bands. Their first EP came out on Glitterhouse Records, a German label that released a lot of punk and grunge stuff. Their first album, Spine of God, came out on Caroline, which was far more geared towards alternative than heavy metal. And they toured with Soundgarden.

- Monster Magnet play stoner rock / space rock, not "heavy metal." They are influenced by '70s stoner-rock and psychedelic bands like Hawkwind. You notice that they cover songs by Hawkwind, not by bands like Judas Priest, Iron Maiden or Motley Crue. '80s heavy metal bands were not, for the most part, directly influenced by the kind of space rock that Hawkwind pioneered and Monster Magnet plays. Not all grunge bands are influenced by stoner/space-rock either, but a few very influential ones were, such as Mudhoney and Screaming Trees. Mudhoney was a very integral part of the early grunge scene in Seattle, and Monster Magnet sounds very similar to Mudhoney.

99.110.212.94 (talk) 15:21, 13 November 2010 (UTC)