Talk:Sur le Pont d'Avignon

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I recall a story I heard that "sur" should really be "sous", and that the whole song refers to a rather macabre story: that in one or other of the various religious conflicts the bridge was used as an elongated gallows, so the "dancing" people were more Strange Fruit ...

Has anyone else heard this version?

Dr Shorthair

Absolutely. The song predates the Revolution, but at that time, it became a grim, popular double-entendre: there was widespread slsughter of the French nobility at and around Avignon. Whether anyone was actually strung up on the bridge is unclear. Mostly, they were just hacked to death or burned in their own homes. But the image was a good one by Jacobin standards-- gentlemen turn this way; ladies now turn that way. The joke was that this referred to the dead bodies swaying in the wind beneath the bridge. Hardcore, man. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 210.131.141.130 (talk) 13:31, 29 October 2011 (UTC)

translation issues[edit]

Isn't "we all dance" or "everyone dances" a much more natural and better translation of "on y danse"? — David W. Hogg 18:34, 16 February 2007 (UTC)

I think it's for the metre of the song, rather than the most literal transaltion. -Tpacw (talk) 22:15, 2 May 2008 (UTC)

WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one article was rated and this bot brought all the other ratings up to at least that level. BetacommandBot 08:08, 27 August 2007 (UTC)

Sound clip[edit]

Pardon me, but that is a truly dreadful sound clip. It's not at all clear when the song actually starts, and it's a bit confusing. Might be better without it at all? -Tpacw (talk) 22:15, 2 May 2008 (UTC)

Dance description[edit]

Is it really necessary to say "pairs of two"? Is this construction used to distinguish pairs of two from pairS of three or five or seven? Seriously, pairs of two?154.5.40.122 (talk) 23:07, 23 December 2011 (UTC)

Fixed. CambridgeBayWeather (talk) 08:08, 24 December 2011 (UTC)

history unclear[edit]

There are no citations, so it's hard to judge the accuracy of this history. We do know that the bridge has been unusable for hundreds of years (16th century?), and is now less than half its original length. Is it possible that there was dancing on the otherwise unusable bridge at one time? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Wikimikef (talkcontribs) 22:40, 13 January 2013 (UTC)

Source text[edit]

Many sources give the text ″L'on y danse″ rather than ″On y danse″. I think this should be mentioned. Jivingfrog (talk) 14:10, 24 November 2016 (UTC)

Avignon papacy[edit]

I always thought the song was a reference to the abundance of prostitutes during the Avignon papacy. Since I have no proper sources I will not edit the article though. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2001:1C03:B00:8C00:D53E:C812:A808:689D (talk) 16:27, 9 September 2017 (UTC)