Talk:T-24 tank

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T-24 is The Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings were established in 1978 in response to a legislative mandate to reduce California's energy consumption. The standards are updated periodically to allow consideration and possible incorporation of new energy efficiency technologies and methods.

Added Soviet AFVs of wWII template.


Could we replace the Komintern section with the following?:


Overview:

The Komintern artillery tractor was a product of the Kharkov Steam Locomotive Factory (KhPZ). It was capable of towing heavy guns and howitzers and was produced prior to The Great Patriotic War.


Description:

Since the Komintern was designed to tow heavy artillery, the first 50 tractors had a powerful engine (4 cylinder 15 l. 131 hp gasoline), a fully enclosed truck cab behind the engine, followed by a wooden cargo bed or benches for up to 12 gun crew. The tractor featured a long, more effective track and suspension borrowed from the company’s T-12/T-24 medium tank which gave a comfortable ride, and a winch was fitted for vehicle recovery tasks.


Development:

Production of the Komintern began in 1934. In 1935 the Komintern went into full production using the chassis and suspension from the company’s T-24 tank project. 1798 tractors were produced from 1934 to 1940. As many as 560 were still in service by 1945.


Operational Notes:

The Komintern was capable of towing the heaviest Corps and Army level guns in Soviet service, including the wheeled ML-20 152mm gun-howitzer, the tracked B-4 203mm howitzer, and BR-5 280mm mortar. It was also assigned to heavy tank recovery units. — Preceding unsigned comment added by FallingLeaf406 (talkcontribs) 11:08, 21 July 2016 (UTC)


Could we replace the Voroshilovets section with the following?:

Overview:

The Voroshilovets was a heavy artillery tractor and recovery vehicle produced by the Kharkov Steam Locomotive Factory (KhPZ) and the Stalingrad Tractor Factory prior to and during the Second World War.

Description:

While similar in general layout to the Komintern tractor it had many differences. The front mounted engine was the huge V12 V-2V from the T-34 tank, generating 375 hp. The cab behind the engine was a modified Zis-5 truck cab. Behind the enclosed cab was a large cargo bed capable of carrying about 3 tonnes of cargo or up to 16 personnel. The suspension was different from the Komintern tractor as it employed two large bogies supporting four pair of road wheels each. The track was supported by 5 return rollers. A 100 kn winch was fitted to support its vehicle recovery role.

All this power meant this tractor was capable of towing all of the Army’s heaviest (tracked carriage) artillery pieces such as the 203mm B-4 howitzer, the Br-5 280mm mortar and the Br-2 152mm gun, with relative ease.

Development:

The Voroshilovetz was a follow on product to the capable Komintern heavy tractor also from the Kharkov locomotive factory. Initial development work began in 1935. The first two prototypes were tested from 1936 to 1938. The vehicle entered mass production in 1939 at the KhPZ plant until 1941 when it was overrun by the Germans. Production was moved to the Stalingrad plant where it remained in production until 1942 when that factory was also shut down due to the war. The tractors remained in service throughout the war.

Operational Notes:

Intended from the outset as a heavy tractor and recovery vehicle, it was assigned to heavy artillery units and heavy tank recovery units. Despite all the power the long tracks made turning difficult and its relatively narrow tracks made operations in heavy mud and snow difficult. The brakes and transmission were also prone to short service cycles due to the high speed and heavy loads common to this vehicle.

New reference: Vollert, Jochen. Tyagatshi: Soviet Full Tracked Artillery Tractors of WW2 in Red Army and Wehrmacht Service. Tankograd Publishing - Verlag Jochern Vollert. (2006) ISBN 3-936519-02-1


FallingLeaf406 (talk) 15:46, 20 July 2016 (UTC)