Talk:T9 (predictive text)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WikiProject Linguistics / Applied Linguistics  (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Linguistics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of linguistics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Applied Linguistics Task Force.
 
WikiProject Telecommunications (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Telecommunications, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Telecommunications on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

T9 Slang[edit]

I removed the following text, as it is unsourced. The sources listed for this content were urban dictionary entries and a livejournal entry, neither are reliable sources. Feel free to put back any portion of this if reliable sources can be found:

  • Since there are multiple possible words for any given key sequence, the T9 interface will often initially
  • present a different word than the desired word. This gives rise to mental associations between otherwise
  • unrelated words that happen to share a T9 key sequence, and in at least one case, such a mapping has entered
  • the lexicon as slang: "book" as a substitute for "cool", based on the T9 key sequence 2-6-6-5. Another, less
  • subtle, example of an ambiguous key sequence with associations between the mappings is that of 2-6-2-5 which
  • yields both "cock" and "anal."

--Xyzzyplugh 09:32, 12 August 2006 (UTC)

History?[edit]

When was this developed? How did it do in the market? Against what systems did it compete at the time? Shinobu 05:07, 1 September 2007 (UTC)

My product design history T9: Text on Nine Keys, added to External Links, answers many of these questions. Lawnjay (talk) 23:13, 3 July 2009 (UTC)

Algorithm?[edit]

Something about how T9 actually works would be nice. There's probably a good (or possibly less so) technical reason why it sometimes goes crazy and accepts/produces non-words. With a Swedish dictionary, it produces things like Michellellellellellelle and Gnageålning (the latter should be Incheckning, a fairly common word not found in the dictionary), and the reason is probably clear to someone who knows how T9 works.Carl T 18:29, 28 October 2007 (UTC)

It always goes crazy on every phone I ever had/have. Andries (talk) 22:17, 11 October 2008 (UTC)

T9 is also on Huawei Phones[edit]

I know this for a fact, as I have a Huawei phone that uses T9. Should I add this? TorontoLRT (talk) 14:18, 5 June 2010 (UTC)


Mixed languages[edit]

So from the text I understand that it works only for one language at the time. But I often type sentences in mixed languages and could this be the reason that T9 never works for me? Andries (talk) 20:05, 5 August 2010 (UTC)

Of course it doesn't mix languages. Dictonaries can contain some common words but not all. Actually it useless for non-latin alphabets as sending SMS with non-latin characters are sent as unicode and so the SMS lenght is cut in half. Technology that makes you pay 2x for the same SMS. So I do not use it for Latvian language for example. There is a need for two dictionary with latin(for SMS) and non-latin(web) letters but sadly it is never provided.

85.254.64.36 (talk) 18:57, 4 August 2011 (UTC)

Poor quality[edit]

I used to have a Siemens cellphone with a comprehensive and extendable T9 dictionary. Unfortunately I lost it. While the Samsung replacement in many respects does its job well the T9 function misses so many words (Swedish) and suggests so many non-words and seems unable to learn anything that it is pretty useless. The T9 function can also be hard to turn on/off on Samsung since it is not in the menus and the manual of my first Samsung forgot to tell about this feature. I thought that maybe each manufacturer built their own dictionary database so that the fault would be Samsung's. I have later been told that the company making T9 was bought by some other company that dropped most of the support for small languages (what a horrific waste if the dictionaries already exist!). It would be interesting if this issue could be treated in the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 150.227.15.253 (talk) 13:52, 25 July 2012 (UTC)

Who created T9?[edit]

I read a news article that stated Martin King as a co-creator of the T9. Who is the other person? Were these engineers of Tegic? news article --88.115.26.13 (talk) 06:03, 25 September 2012 (UTC)

There should be a Criticism entry[edit]

On some phones I resolutely cannot get the phone to produce the word I want. The fact that there is no standard for T9 and no test suite should be brought out. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.187.52.248 (talk) 19:45, 3 March 2014 (UTC)