Talk:Tashkent

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History of ARABS in Rassia[edit]

The central Asian Arabs of Afghanistan: pastoral nomadism in transition By Thomas Jefferson Barfield —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.204.45.116 (talk) 05:15, 19 January 2011 (UTC)


Untitled[edit]

Hello everyone, I want to create a megaportal on the Metro systems of the FSU and some eastern European ones (with potentially expanding to cover other things like railroad city transportt etc). Have look at how we wrote the entries for Moscow, Saint Petersburg and Kiev, if anyone is ineterested in starting the Tashkent metro article, please go ahead. Kuban kazak 23:56, 2 November 2005 (UTC)

who vandalize the article and history[edit]

what the hell "16th century uzbeks replaced Persian-speaking population"?????? I have historical fact that my ancestors live here for more than 1500 years in my motherland, hometown TASHKENT. Ethnic Tashkent live here from the start of the city.

Setting aside emotions and other stuff, IMHO would agree there's smth to be corrected. My points are: a) historic source indicate the influx of Turkic tribes in the first millenium. b) they also show that the indigenous population was Persian. Those migrating groups who adopted a settled lifestyle and merged with local and linguistically and ethnically Persian population became bilingual in fact. c) another factor to be accounted for is that one should differentiate between uses of the term Uzbek. It can be applied to refer to 1) citizens of the modern Uzbekistan, 2) etnic groups, 3) tribes under command of Shaybani khan. I urge everyone, including my fellow Uzbeks to be more rational and academic. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Sahib-qiron (talkcontribs) 13:01, 5 September 2007 (UTC)

POV paragraph[edit]

As edit history for 2007-04-14 shows, this paragraph is POV. On April 25 1966, Tashkent was destroyed by a huge earthquake (7.5 on the Richter scale). Over 300,000 were left homeless. Soviet historians made a great story about "battalions of fraternal peoples” and urban planners from each of the Soviet republics, who “volunteered” to rebuild devastated Tashkent. They did a good job, creating a “model Soviet city” of wide shady streets, parks, immense plazas for military parades, fountains, monuments, and acres of apartment blocks. At that time residents of Tashkent began to realize that they were not being consulted in the planning, or necessarily being hired in the rebuilding. The problem exploded when Moscow announced that 20% of the new buildings would be given to the mostly Russian “volunteers”, who would be staying permanently. The subsequent riots were called the Pakhtakor Incident, after the stadium where the trouble began. The Red Army eventually had to be called in to "maintain order". Ufwuct 10:36, 14 April 2007 (UTC)

The para was POV in style but, from my understanding of being a 10 year resident in the city, the facts ae ther that:

  • Soviet historians made a great story (propaganda?) about "battalions of fraternal peoples” and urban planners from each of the Soviet republics, who “volunteered” to rebuild devastated Tashkent. There are Finnish as well a other Soviet housing styles there in the city from this time.
  • They did create a “model Soviet city” of wide shady streets, parks, immense plazas for military parades, fountains, monuments, and acres of apartment blocks. In fact this defines most of today's Tashkent.
  • At that time residents of Tashkent began to realize that they were not being consulted in the planning, or necessarily being hired in the rebuilding. The problem exploded when Moscow announced that 20% of the new buildings would be given to the mostly Russian “volunteers”, who would be staying permanently. There remained, even in the 1990's among older Russian residents, a dislike of the newer incommers from this time who were considered ne-kulturniy (uncivilized) and many thought that other republics and cities had done some quiet social engineering by dumping their undesirables on Tashkent in the guise of voluntary help! The newer Russians had less respect for the Uzbek culture and less inclination to learn simple politeness of words, gestures and behavior.
  • The subsequent riots were called the Pakhtakor Incident, after the stadium where the trouble began. The Red Army eventually had to be called in to "maintain order". This certainly happened, but I am not sure of its true causes. It started at a football match betwen teams whose support came fro on one hand the Russians and on the other the Uzbeks.

More needs to be said about the redevelopment because it did create the modern city but POV is the issue.

Have made amendments Cosnahang (talk) 17:56, 7 November 2008 (UTC)

The Pakhtakor Incident was a significant event in the history of modern Tashkent, and regardless of controversity over the causes of the incident, deserves mention in the article. --MChew (talk) 06:42, 8 November 2008 (UTC)

The largest city square and tallest Lenin's monument in USSR[edit]

In the article it is stated that the largest city square and tallest Lenin's monument in USSR were in Tashkent. Unfortunately the author did not mention the source. The list of "Largest city squares" in Wikipedia-EN does not include Tashkent at all. I googled a little and found claims that tallest Lenin's monument is in Zaporoje, Ukraine.

Does anyone have facts/sources?

When the city square in Tashkent was build it was the largest in USSR. So was the Lenin's statue. The statue was removed in 1991, but I'm not sure what happened to the city squareBmn187 (talk) 00:54, 27 November 2007 (UTC)

Geography[edit]

Two facts are incorrect. Altai mountains - incorrect. Tashkent lies at the foot of Western Tien-Shan. Chimgan river - incorrect. The river's name is Chirchiq.

The only reason I came to this article is because is is exactly opposite to my city on the globe. (Campbell River, BC, Canada). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.66.90.217 (talk) 15:01, 1 August 2010 (UTC)

Shash[edit]

Chach > Shash (Şaş) > Taşkent Böri (talk) 12:58, 23 February 2012 (UTC)

Tashkent's Climate[edit]

As crazy as it sounds, based on the Koppen system Tashkent indeed has a Mediterranean climate. The city has no month where average monthly temperatures falls below -3 C, so it’s not a D (Continental) climate. The city's coldest monthly average is about 2 C which is about 5 C higher than a D climate threshold. It's not bordering the Continental Climate threshold. The city features wet winters and dry summers, with the driest summer month seeing about 3% of the precipitation of the wettest winter month. This eliminates it from the humid subtropical climate category. Tashkent’s warmest month average is well above 22 C, so it’s not any form of an oceanic climate. When you run the calculations for aridity (see semi-arid climate page for guidance on this) for Tashkent, you’ll find that the climate is not quite semi-arid. Despite its decidedly unconventional location for a Mediterranean climate, Tashkent has this climate. G. Capo (talk) 03:55, 5 February 2013 (UTC)

Agree, it would have a Mediterranean climate based on the Koppen climate classification (based on the data). There are other places in the world that have a Mediterranean climate even though they are not located in the ocean (a typical location) such as parts of California, Chile, and Spain. Even on the map based on the source by Peel et al. on the Köppen climate classification page, the city is clearly located in the csa or Mediterranean climate.Ssbbplayer (talk) 00:14, 6 February 2013 (UTC)

mediterranean climate??? LOL[edit]

mediterranean climate is influenced by the sea, a city thousands kilometers far from the sea can't have a mediterranean climate, according what's is written Tashkent has a semiarid/continental climate, on the contrary mediterranean climate is mild, but anyone whatching pictures about the area where Tashkent is located could conclude that's a steppic arid/semiarid area, nothing to spare with the verdant landscapes that characterize mediterranean areas.

Tashkent is not that far from Aydar Lake. The lake would constitute a body of water large enough to have some effect on precipitation patterns. Going by the data, as bizarre as this sounds, Tashkent indeed has a Mediterranean climate according to Koppen's system. G. Capo (talk) 20:22, 8 May 2017 (UTC)

persian?[edit]

What the heck Sasanid Empire is doing in this article? "In the mid-seventh century, the Sasanian Persian Empire collapsed as a result of the Arab Muslim conquest of Persia. Under the Samanid dynasty (819–999), whose founder Saman Khuda was a Persian Zoroastrian convert to Islam, the city came to be known as Binkath. However, the Arabs retained the old name of Chach for the surrounding region, pronouncing it ash-Shash instead." I am cleaning the article from irrelevant Persian links. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.125.194.43 (talk) 04:20, 10 June 2014 (UTC)

whoever wants to change the article[edit]

Whoever wants to change the article in should check with articles in Uzbek/Russian/Turkish and other neighboring languages. Vandalizing the article, adding irrelevant links (i.e. our "beloved" Persian friends, who think themselves "Greek" analogy of Asia, who think everything was/should be related to Persian) is prohibited. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.125.194.43 (talk) 04:45, 10 June 2014 (UTC)

Timeline of Tashkent[edit]

What is missing from the recently created city timeline article? Please add relevant content. Contributions welcome. Thank you. -- M2545 (talk) 14:36, 19 May 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Origin of television[edit]

The section "Origin of television" is out-of-place in this page: The text does not say in which manner it is related to the city. Scientific and technical discoveries are most often more closely related to preceding discoveries than to the city/environment in which they were made (at least in the 20th century). The development of television is described in Television. I would suggest that this section should be moved there. Professor Tournesol (talk) 21:11, 17 April 2016 (UTC)

Notable people?[edit]

Hi, is there any reason why we don't have a 'Notable residents' section for Tashkent? thanks.. Coolabahapple (talk) 03:28, 25 April 2016 (UTC)

Assessment comment[edit]

The comment(s) below were originally left at Talk:Tashkent/Comments, and are posted here for posterity. Following several discussions in past years, these subpages are now deprecated. The comments may be irrelevant or outdated; if so, please feel free to remove this section.

I have made some minor changes in the Transport section of Tashkent Page. The reason is very simple that a visitor to the page would like to get transport related information because of that I have linked pages for Transport information. As the information is constantly changing so it is not possible to create separate pages in wikipedia. Pages are not commercial bus only information.(haroonchoudhry 20:25, 26 May 2010 (UTC)).

Last edited at 20:25, 26 May 2010 (UTC). Substituted at 07:39, 30 April 2016 (UTC)

"Republic of Tashkent"[edit]

According to this academic paper from a conference of Russian numismatists Tashkent was first ruled by and then became independent from the Kazakh Khanate, and it names other information not in this article, could I use the non-coin related stuff in this article or would I need another source? --42.112.157.115 (talk) 05:32, 15 July 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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