Talk:Technology

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Former good article nomineeTechnology was a Engineering and technology good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
August 28, 2010Good article nomineeNot listed

Definition of technologys technologys[edit]

"Technology is the knowledge and practice of how to produce things."The word technology can also be defined as a collection of techniques.It can also be view as an activity that forms or changes the culture.[1]

Technology: “A knowledge of techniques, methods and designs that work, and in certain ways with certain consequences, even when one cannot explain exactly why.”[2]

Technology as distinct from science: “It is important to distinguish between science and technology, for science as such can have no place in the present volume. Though the dividing line is sometimes imprecise, it undoubtedly exists. In our context, at least, science is the product of minds seeking to reveal natural laws that govern the universe. Technology, on the other hand, seeks to find practical ways to use scientific discoveries profitably, ways of turning scientific knowledge into utilitarian processes and devices.” [3]

It should also be noted that technology before the late 19th century was not based on science. Also, engineering did not arise until the early 19th century.

“Throughout the period and indeed well into the 19th C, theoretical science was in large measure devoted to understanding the achievements of technology.”[4]

References

  1. ^ Bjork, Gordon J. (1999). The Way It Worked and Why It Won’t: Structural Change and the Slowdown of U.S. Economic Growth. Westport, CT; London: Praeger. ISBN 0-275-96532-5.
  2. ^ Rosenberg, Nathan (1982). Inside the Black Box: Technology and Economics. Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 143. ISBN 0-521-27367-6.
  3. ^ McNeil, Ian (1990). An Encyclopedia of the History of Technology. London: Routledge. p. 3. ISBN 0415147921.
  4. ^ Landes, David. S. (1969). The Unbound Prometheus: Technological Change and Industrial Development in Western Europe from 1750 to the Present. Cambridge, New York: Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge. p. 32. ISBN 0-521-09418-6.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Phmoreno (talkcontribs) 14:51, 5 January 2015‎ (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 19 April 2018[edit]

2.50.28.120 (talk) 08:51, 19 April 2018 (UTC)

History of technology, the development over time of systematic techniques for making and doing things. The term technology, a combination of the Greek technē, “art, craft,” with logos, “word, speech,” meant in Greece a discourse on the arts, both fine and applied. When it first appeared in English in the 17th century, it was used to mean a discussion of the applied arts only, and gradually these “arts” themselves came to be the object of the designation. By the early 20th century, the term embraced a growing range of means, processes, and ideas in addition to tools and machines.

 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. AntiCedros (talk) 09:18, 19 April 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 28 August 2018[edit]

Ziadelwan (talk) 17:32, 28 August 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 28 August 2018[edit]

Ziadelwan (talk) 17:33, 28 August 2018 (UTC)
 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. L293D ( • ) 18:44, 28 August 2018 (UTC)