Talk:The Hallelujah Trail

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3-projector Cinerama?[edit]

It's highly unlikely the original single negative would have been optically divided into three strips for conventional Cinerama projection. If nothing else, the film's aspect ratio is about 2.2:1, which isn't anywhere nearly wide enough to justify such a thing. WilliamSommerwerck (talk) 19:25, 13 April 2012 (UTC)

I actually saw The Hallelujah Trail in New York City during its original release and three projectors were definitely used to exhibit the film. It's the only Cinerama film I've ever seen in a theatre so I'm not mixing it up with something else, it absolutely was shown that way and made a tremendous impact on me as a result. I'm responding because this has bothered me for some years since whenever I happen to look the film up somewhere, there is no mention of this, almost as though I'm a character from a Jack Finney time travel novel who briefly inhabited a parallel universe. Trust me (and I know that actually having seen the movie myself would probably qualify as "original research" under Wikipedia rules), it was exhibited with three projectors whose beams crossed, one for the left third of the screen, one for the middle third, and one for the right third of the screen. Cinerama Comment (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 13:04, 2 May 2013 (UTC)
As usual wiki is wrong again. "The Hallelujah Trail" was shot in Ultra Panavision 70 with a single camera but presented by selected theatres in Super Cinerama, a process that actually uses three prints and therefore of course three projectors. The main difference to the original Cinerama was that the three projectors were not spread over the back of the room but rather combined in a single booth. So, user Cinerama Comment is right, maybe he can verify the single booth. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 46.115.75.230 (talk) 09:20, 1 November 2013 (UTC)

I think this is a confusion. "Super Cinerama" referred to a number of theaters built in the early 1960s to exhibit the Cinerama format. Please provide references to later films that were shot in 70mm and then split into three separate strips. I have never heard of this being done. The only exception being 70mm segments which were incorporated into "How the West Was Won" which was otherwise filmed in the 3-strip format. Best, Markhh (talk) 04:49, 2 November 2013 (UTC)

No it is not. I can only provide this source in german http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon&tag=det&id=2242 an online lexicon for movie terminology by the university of Kiel. The original Cinerama process was too limited and complicated for the filming of features and thus was abandoned. Super Cinerama was a workaround for the specially designed Cinerama theaters and their curved projection screens that made use of three prints. As the filming was done by a single camera and therefore only from one angle of view separate booths no longer were required. Check out the technical specifications on imdb for various movies and you will find 35mm, 70mm, and Super Cinerama given for the printed film formats. No distributor would have gone to the expense of providing a third single print format just for a handful of venues, he would have told owners to scrap their equipment and convert their theaters to 70mm. Also, no regular customer would have paid good money to see a presentation he could get for less in any ordinary theater. Please note the statement from user Cinerama Comment, he writes "it was exhibited with three projectors whose beams crossed", this indicates exactly Super Cinerama. It might be redundant, but the article fails to mention it, Cinerama was a filming process as well as an exhibition process, using 3 cameras and 3 projectors in 3 booths, whereas Super Cinerama was only an exhibition process, using 3 projectors in one booth, the filming provided by any single camera process – preferably 70mm – and split up into 3 prints. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 46.115.35.98 (talk) 18:29, 13 November 2013 (UTC)