Talk:The Lathe of Heaven

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Lathe of Heaven[edit]

The origin of turning dates to around 1300 BCE when the Ancient Egyptians first developed a two-person lathe. One to turn the wood to be machined and one to shape the wood. It looked a great deal like how we start fires today. Joseph Needham who told Ursula LeGuin the story about the Chinese not having a lathe made a case for claiming Taoism destroyed scientific advance and having a lathe in ancient China would refute his theory. -- 14:12, 4 April 2014‎ User:JohnLloydScharf

How does lathes existing in ancient Egypt automatically mean that they would also exist in ancient China? In any case, Needham was the leading mid-20th-century historian of science and technology in China. AnonMoos (talk) 15:29, 13 April 2014 (UTC)

Change reality or create alternative realities?[edit]

The summary confuses whether the dreams create alternative realities or alter reality. Is it one or the other - or both?Royalcourtier (talk) 07:12, 14 February 2015 (UTC)

There's no indication that this is switching between alternate worlds. George Orr considers that this is a single reality, whose nature he can change.
That past events have changed is the most original element in the plot. --GwydionM (talk) 17:41, 14 February 2015 (UTC)

The Lathe of Heaven and H. G. Wells[edit]

Would it be worth mentioning that H. G. Wells wrote a short story on some of the same themes, "The Man Who Could Work Miracles"? It's about a man who has the power to alter reality by wishing it. JHobson3 (talk) 13:01, 22 December 2015 (UTC)

Not that similar. And lots of other SF & Fantasy has used it. --GwydionM (talk) 10:01, 23 December 2015 (UTC)

Plot summary problems[edit]

The summary needs work. Some things, like the dream that turns everybody gray, are mentioned twice. Also the long description at the beginning doesn't describe the "real world", just the current world that George has dreamed up. We don't know what the "real world" was because we don't know when George's first dream was. For example, he mentions dreaming his aunt out of existence as a teenager, and that predates the nuclear-holocaust dream 73.137.170.88 (talk) 04:56, 19 January 2016 (UTC)