Talk:The Sunday Telegraph

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error of 1953[edit]

In his book "genes, girls, and gamow", James Watson states (quote): "During my absence, the first newspaper article that reflected an interview with Francis Crick came out. It was in the Sunday Telegraph and reached a large audience." (from page 21, Chapter 4: Cambridge July-August 1953.) The error was repeated by Victor K. McElheny in the biography "Watson and DNA" published in 2003.

The only problem being that the Sunday Telegraph did NOT exist in 1953, and repeated searches of the newspaper archives have NOT found any trace of such an article, with a Crick interview! So Watson may not be an entirely reliable source for this quotation, even when repeated by the BBC; I suggest that the text and the BBC reference need to be qualified to reflect the above?

IF ANYONE CAN CONFIRM DETAILS OF THE JUNE 1953 BRITISH SUNDAY NEWSPAPER ARTICLE, DO PLEASE ADVISE THEM TO ME ASAP! Martin Packer — Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.120.97.230 (talk) 12:09, 21 June 2011 (UTC)

removed from article[edit]

I removed the following from the article as it just doesn't make sense:

The paper was launched in 1961 following the loss of the contract to use the daily paper's presses to produce The Sunday Times.

And it is not supported by any references, and it raises more questions than it answers:

  • If "The Sunday Times" was produced on the same presses as the daily paper, doesn't that imply "The Sunday Times" existed already? So what is meant by saying it was created after it could no longer be produced on the same presses?
  • What is "the contract" in which use of the definite article suggests that the reader is supposed to know about already? Was it a contract of the publisher with a union of newspaper printer persons or with whom, to do what? And how was it "lost"?
  • Suppose "The Daily Telegraph" had editions every day including Sunday. How could a contract with a union or whomever, or loss of such a contract, force a newspaper to be divided into two entities with two editorial boards?

--doncram 07:48, 30 August 2015 (UTC)

I further removed the following, because it is not supported and/or because it is not encyclopedic or relevant:

  • Every year, the paper publishes a list of Britain's top 100 private companies entitled Top Track 100.[citation needed]
  • The paper was launched in 1961.
  • Peregrine Worsthorne is the paper's best known journalist,[citation needed] and was associated with the title from 1961 to 1997, including being editor for three years from 1986 to 1989.
  • In 1989, the Sunday title was briefly merged into a seven-day operation under Max Hastings's overall control.
  • In 2005, under the editorship of Sarah Sands, the paper was revamped, a glossy fashion magazine being added to the more traditional review section. The masthead was changed, but following her dismissal it was returned to its gothic style.
  • The editors of The Sunday Telegraph have included:
1961: Donald McLachlan
1966: Brian Roberts
1976: J. W. M. Thompson
1986: Peregrine Worsthorne
1989: Trevor Grove
1992: Charles Moore
1995: Dominic Lawson
2005: Sarah Sands
2006: Richard Ellis (acting)
2006: Patience Wheatcroft
2007: Ian MacGregor
2013: Jason Seiken
Category:Publications established in 1961
Category:1961 establishments in the United Kingdom
Category:Newspaper companies of the United Kingdom

Note it is not clear this is or ever was a different company, separate from the Telegraph Media Group, which remains mentioned in the article. --doncram 18:36, 6 September 2015 (UTC)