Talk:Third-generation programming language

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Can BASIC be called a modern programming language now, in 2005?

"Modern" programming languages would IMHO include languages like ML and Haskell; if Java is included, then it would be because it is mainstream now, its ideas were modern in the 1980s, when C was mainstream.

I say no. BASIC hasn't been officially updated in ages and it doesn't support most things expect from a modern programming language, such as polymorphism. The real question is, is language like C or Java modern and what makes a progamming language modern? FrederikHertzum (talk) 15:18, 15 June 2008 (UTC)

I'd say yes BASIC is a modern language, in that many versions are currently in use. Training is still being developed and done with it, see youtube or a number of colleges. Popular recent versions would include VisualBasic starting in the late 2000s. 71.88.51.20 (talk) 13:16, 21 July 2013 (UTC)


Some compilers of some languages compile program source into "intermediate language" which has lower level of abstraction but it still much larger than 2G. Which level these languages has? Which level this intermediate language has?

I think that's likely third-generation, in the sense that 1st is machine or hardwired, 2nd is assembly code, third is compiled or interpreted. The definitions for fourth or fifth seem not as clear, I'd tend to say the builtin libraries (extending the language) and object-oriented change things, and as sidebar it moved to video edited and interactive compilers with debug IDEs after 3rd gen tools punched cards and flowcharts. Though those aren't linguistic per se, but the environment moved how language was used. 71.88.51.20 (talk) 13:20, 21 July 2013 (UTC)

Programming language generations[edit]

This group of articles has problems. Please see current discussion at Talk:Second-generation programming language. Trevor Hanson 20:10, 7 October 2007 (UTC)


Reorganization[edit]

Pursuing the suggestions to reorganize this material, I have created a page called Programming language generations, using this and additional material, as explained on its discussion page. If interested, please go there and make further improvements. Thanks CSProfBill (talk) 14:38, 23 September 2009 (UTC)