Talk:Time

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Former featured article candidateTime is a former featured article candidate. Please view the links under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. For older candidates, please check the archive.
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May 22, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
September 18, 2007Good article nomineeNot listed
Current status: Former featured article candidate

Direction of time's "flow"[edit]

Wikipedia is not a place for original ideas so I'm asking if anyone is familiar with acceptable sources that may present an alternative to the lead sentence's (common) description as "from the past through the present to the future." Some popular web pages suggest that the current of time brings the future into the present and the present into the past in that objects are not carried by but resist time's flow. Dates on the other hand ride the current of time keeping pace with its flow. Tomorrow's date yields no resistance being suspended in time and so moves with the current and eventually arrives not at a point further into the future but at the present and then it will be carried into the past. The current of time eventually sweeps our entire earthly lives back into the past. Time is not carrying us forward but we are resisting its backward flow. Of course though the perception that "times flows forward" is nearly ubiquitous. Anyone know any such sources? Bob Enyart, Denver KGOV radio host (talk) 02:31, 22 January 2018 (UTC)

Time is fundamental movement. Space is fundamental form. Everything of space exists because of the presence of a quantum point object at every fundamental position in space, and time exists because there is action in that quantum point that stretches it in the time direction, the energy direction, and in the contained time-space object form, namely atoms (matter). Regards, -Inowen (talk) 04:00, 14 May 2018 (UTC)
@Inowen: you might have given me notice of this. - DVdm (talk) 08:29, 25 May 2018 (UTC)
It didn't seem proper that you simply removed my short comment. I asked at the Village Pump and they pointed me to the policy, which states clearly that I may object and the remover must desist. -Inowen (nlfte) 23:30, 27 May 2018 (UTC)
It would have been proper to have notified me of your question at the village pump. - DVdm (talk) 07:16, 28 May 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 6 May 2018[edit]

In the World time section, can you please add the image Standard World Time Zones.png to show the time zones of the world and how Earth is split up into time zones? Thank you. 2601:183:101:58D0:9C3A:41A8:F09D:1BC8 (talk) 22:09, 6 May 2018 (UTC)

 Not done: See Time_zone#UTC_offsets_worldwide, which is already linked from this article. Eggishorn (talk) (contrib) 22:23, 6 May 2018 (UTC)

Where in the article is it linked to? 2601:183:101:58D0:9C3A:41A8:F09D:1BC8 (talk) 23:07, 6 May 2018 (UTC)

 Not done: In the Time#Current_application_of_UTC section. Eggishorn (talk) (contrib) 23:28, 6 May 2018 (UTC)

Rovelli book[edit]

Twice have I removed ([1], [2]) a book from the books list, added ([3], [4]) by user Temugin (talk · contribs), whose edits all are related to this author Rovelli—see wp:SPA. The book is not cited as a content reference, so it looks like wp:refspam. Any thoughts? - DVdm (talk) 20:55, 12 June 2018 (UTC)

Reference?[edit]

I think this sentence "This view is shared by Abrahamic faiths as they believe time started by creation, therefore the only thing being infinite is God and everything else, including time, is finite." should have a reference, or at least specify who it refers to, because 'Abrahamic faiths' is an enormous amount of groups of people over a very long time. They don't all presently have this exact view on time, nor would they have in the past all had this same specific view. Waylah (talk) 07:59, 26 June 2018 (UTC)

Please put talk page page messages at the bottom. Thanks.
 Removed ([5]) the sentence as wp:unsourced, likely wp:OR. Feel free to put it back with a source. - DVdm (talk) 08:11, 26 June 2018 (UTC)

Please add the following content in the section of See also.......[edit]

Section 7.1 Biopsychology: Speeding up or slowing down of time.[edit]

Section 7.1 states:

Such chemicals will either excite or inhibit the firing of neurons in the brain, with a greater firing rate allowing the brain to register the occurrence of more events within a given interval (speed up time) and a decreased firing rate reducing the brain's capacity to distinguish events occurring within a given interval (slow down time).

Aren't the perceptions of time speeding up or slowing down being reversed here? If the brain speeds up, time appears to slow down, and if the brain slows down, then time appears to speed up.

If the brain registers more events within a given interval, then subjectively one would perceive that time slowed. An interval of 1 actual (as measured by a clock) second might feel like 4 seconds. Hence the experience of an accident unfolding in slow motion.

On the other hand, reducing the brain's capacity to distinguish events occurring within a given interval, makes it feel as if things are happening faster than they actually are, in other words it feels as if time is speeding up. e.g.: under the effect of alcohol, reaction times slow, and a driver might not be able to avoid a sudden obstacle. To the driver, it is as if time sped up, leaving them insufficient time to react.

If you concur, then I recommend replacing the original text with:

Such chemicals will either excite or inhibit the firing of neurons in the brain, with a greater firing rate allowing the brain to register the occurrence of more events within a given interval (slow down time) and a decreased firing rate reducing the brain's capacity to distinguish events occurring within a given interval (speed up time). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Andrew seligman (talkcontribs) 05:37, 18 August 2018 (UTC)

Please sign all your talk page messages with four tildes (~~~~) — See Help:Using talk pages. Thanks.
Yes, stimulants increase the firing rate, and that results in overestimating time intervals. That part is sourced. So stimulants make things take longer to happen, so time slows down. I don't know what Rita Carter's The Human Brain Book says on pages 186,187 though. Can someone verify? - DVdm (talk) 09:12, 18 August 2018 (UTC)