Talk:Tire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Automobiles (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Automobiles, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of automobiles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Technology (Rated C-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Technology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 


High pressure section?[edit]

The section of the article labeled as "high pressure" seems to be advancing an unsubstantiated personal viewpoint of an editor, and also seems to be incorrect. An overinflated tire will have a smaller contact patch and (depending on the rubber compound used and the tire construction) may have significantly less grip than a correctly inflated tire. 107.1.64.82 (talk) 20:09, 10 April 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to 2 external links on Tire. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true to let others know.

You may set the |checked=, on this template, to true or failed to let other editors know you reviewed the change. If you find any errors, please use the tools below to fix them or call an editor by setting |needhelp= to your help request.

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

If you are unable to use these tools, you may set |needhelp=<your help request> on this template to request help from an experienced user. Please include details about your problem, to help other editors.

Cheers. —cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 19:17, 28 August 2015 (UTC)


Sound and Vibration Characteristics?[edit]

This section says; '(t)here is a study 'under development' which aims to predict the interior noise due to the vibrations of a rolling tire…' yet, there's no citation, nothing, whatsoever to back this up.

Etymology[edit]

I removed the whole first paragraph of the etymology section as it had no references and I could find none online. The Oxford English Dictionary gives the one that is now first. I cannot think of a more respected source then the OED for etymology. Nick Beeson (talk) 21:24, 26 January 2017 (UTC)

Hydroplaning and bicycles[edit]

I removed the paragraph

Hydroplaning becomes more prevalent with wider tires (because of the lower weight per contact area) and especially at higher speeds; it is of virtually no concern to bicycle tires under normal riding conditions largely because of the lower speeds. The chance of car hydroplaning is also minimal at bicycle speeds as the weight per contact area of car tires is not much lower if any than bicycle tires.

I added

Hydroplaning is more prevalent with wider tires and at higher speeds.

to the previous paragraph (though it perhaps should be marked as needing sourcing also).

There was no source for the statements. Most bicycles have tires with much higher pressure than most automobile tires, and thus likely (though not certainly) much higher weight per unit of contact area (contact patch pressure). Authorities such as Sheldon Brown [1] give a complex of reasons that bicycles are not subject to hydroplaning, yet high contact patch pressure is not one of them.

The main article on hydroplaning linked does not even mention bicycles. If the lack of bicycle hydroplaning is important enough to mention here, it should be expanded in the main article, not missing.

Paleolith (talk) 04:39, 21 February 2017 (UTC)

  1. ^ Brown, Sheldon. "Bicycle Tires and Tubes".