Talk:Transitional Federal Parliament

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Reduced Cabinet[edit]

It should be noted that the reduced cabinet and the change of ministers was mostly due to the loss of power by the warlords of Mogadisho who lost all their 'lands' and consequently, all their power in the process.

I read an Article in the BBC about it.

Feel free to dig up the article and make a citation and an update to this entry. --Petercorless 18:11, 25 December 2006 (UTC)

Transitional National Government[edit]

This article links to "Transitional National Government", but that is a redirect back to this article. It should be explained here. -- Beland 18:05, 25 December 2006 (UTC)

Agreed. The TFG and the TFP both deserve their own pages. I also wish to have a page for the TFC -- the Charter -- and a page for the concept of the "TFIs" -- the Transitional Federal Institutions, which comprise the TFP, TFC and TFG all combined. The TFG is the executive branch of government, and the TFP is the legislative branch. The charter is, well, the charter. This article conflates the two (TFG+TFP) into a single page. It would be like having the US President and Executive Branch on the same page as Congress. Given some additional contributions by folks, it might be time to try to split these into individual pages. The TFG, which controls the Prime Minister, and all cabinet members including the Ministry of Defense, and thus the army, is where most pages related to the war should link, though there are times when individual members of the TFP -- Members of Parliament -- took their own initiatives and actions which might have supported, or actually run entirely counter, to the TFG (executive branch) directions. Those would link instead to the TFP page. This split is something I have put off for now, but it's on my conceptual "to-do" list. --Petercorless 07:58, 31 December 2006 (UTC)
Doah! Also, your point above about the "Transitional National Government" deserves some mention. The TNG is actually the precursor attempt to organize a government before the present "Transitional Federal Government". More acronym soup in the bowl of politics known as Somalia! Again, something on the to-do list, or, we might make a separate TNG page that points to the TFP/TFG as successor organizations. --Petercorless 08:04, 31 December 2006 (UTC)
Closed - Transitional National Government is now separate. --Petercorless 13:58, 8 February 2007 (UTC)

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History of the TFG/TFP split[edit]

I made a split of the History section to a new page: History of the Transitional Federal Government of the Republic of Somalia. This was to allow the main TFP page (and/or a separate TFG page) to remain current—and briefer—while the history page of the nascent government can be a (growing) archival reference. The present TFG page was woefully inadequate of explaining how, precisely, the government got to be established. This was to fill in the gaps for those unfamiliar with the twists and turns of Somali politics. --Petercorless 08:01, 31 December 2006 (UTC)

Changing the color of the table[edit]

I changed the color to a normal white background. This page strikes me as a CIA hit list. My first impression of this page is, "Oh here is a list of the people in the region that should be assassinated." It just didn't feel neutral. I'm not sure why but thought I would add this comment here in case anyone else had the same thought. Jeff Carr 15:48, 10 January 2007 (UTC)

The CIA keeps a list of all the members of government of all the nations of the world. This is not a "hit list." --Petercorless 14:31, 17 January 2007 (UTC)

Somaliland[edit]

This article in mentioning that Somalia has been under the warlords since 1991 fails to mention the functioning government of the Republic of Somaliland in the north. Though Somaliland is not a 'central government' in the sense of claiming to rule over all of Somalia, it is in fact a government and ought to be mentioned in some way, particularly in light of the transitional government's attitudes toward it. --Sephiroth9611 16:28, 14 January 2007 (UTC)

Why, yes it does fail to mention Somaliland other than as a "See also" in the Politics of Somalia template. It also fails to mention the government of Puntland and the government of Galmudug, and the government of the ICU. Those each have their own separate pages. They are mentioned on the page regarding the Transitional Federal Charter, which shows that the government claims the territory of Somaliland as part of its sovereign territory. It is also described on the page for the War in Somalia (2006–present), where the protests occurred. What in particular more did you want said here? --Petercorless 14:36, 17 January 2007 (UTC)
With lines like The country has been run for more than a decade by tribal factions and warlords, I just think that this article perpetuates along with the international media the fiction that all of Somalia is in fact a war zone when that is not in fact the case. It comes off as slightly biased in that the TFG is the only force working to stabilize Somalia. --Sephiroth9611 19:35, 18 January 2007 (UTC)
Are you sure you are commenting on the right Talk page? This is for the Transitional Federal Government (TFG). --Petercorless 14:01, 8 February 2007 (UTC)

The list of cabinet members is definitely wrong[edit]

I know for sure that there were 10 cabinet positions changed recently, but only have citations in the media for about half of them. If anyone can keep an eye out for additional listings, that would be useful. The official TFG page is a mess. --Petercorless 14:03, 8 February 2007 (UTC)

Contradiction[edit]

The article appears to contradict itself. The lead says that the parliament has "450 members". But the first section (Overview), says that the parliament "had 275 members", which was doubled in 2009, to include "200 representatives from the Islamist opposition and 75 reprentatives of citizens' groups and diaspora representatives". This adds up to 550 members instead of 450. I can't find the correct number anywhere. 83.80.18.68 (talk) 09:03, 24 August 2010 (UTC)

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