Talk:Tripiṭaka tablets at Kuthodaw Pagoda

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Page Title[edit]

Even though this isn't a printed book, I think we should still follow WP:NC-BK... Does this book even have a title? I doubt people refer to it as the World's largest book, if a title exists. I dunno. --Cheeesemonger (talk) 01:12, 7 April 2008 (UTC)

The title is The Tipitaka or Tripitaka. Wagaung (talk) 11:43, 8 April 2008 (UTC)
Good point --it is a bit informal to refer to this as "the world's largest book", though it has become a sort of name for the monument for the past 150 years. Probably, this entire article should be set up as a bunch of sub-headings under the name of the temple/monument (i.e., naming the temple as the home of "the world's largest book"). The book is, in effect, The Pali Canon, not normally thought of as one book, plus a few paracanonical volumes, as I recall. On the other hand, the wiki does have articles such as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Largest_organisms ! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.29.18.73 (talk) 07:02, 26 July 2009 (UTC)
The article Kuthodaw Pagoda already exists and mentions "the world's largest book" the temple contains in its grounds, but this merits an article of its own. The Pali Canon is not a book title whereas the Tripitaka (The Three Baskets) is. Wagaung (talk) 09:02, 26 July 2009 (UTC)

Two additions.

  • Myanmars Buddhism belongs to the theravada school, the language of their holy texts is Pali, thus the name is rather Tipitaka than Tripitaka (the latter being Sanskrit).
  • Nevertheless, "Tipitaka" has the same degree of abstraction as "Bible", and is thus not a suitable name for this article. An article about the T(r)ipitaka might of course mention the Kuthodaw Pagoda as an very impressive edition. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.187.109.17 (talk) 10:29, 25 January 2010 (UTC)
This is by means the largest "book" in the world: though not so accessible, the ancient edition of the Triptaka carved on stone slabs at Fangshan is by far much larger ~ it currently has 14,278 extant slabs.-- अनाम गुमनाम 17:41, 21 October 2011 (UTC)

Question: "World's Largest Book" seems misleading, as it's not what would commonly be considered a "book," i.e. it's on tablets, not pages, as far as I can tell from the article, and it doesn't actually hold the Guiness world record for largest book — the citation to the India's World Records seems dubious at best. 45.48.161.235 (talk) 22:02, 22 January 2016 (UTC)

Another perspective - as suggested by previous comments, are people searching Wikipedia and the internet for "World's largest book" looking for an example of the Tipitaka, as stone tablets, at Kuthodaw Pagoda? From the opposite end of that question, are people interested in the topic of this monument really going to search Wikipedia or the internet for "world's largest book"? It seems to me that this should be either moved into the monument's article, into the text's article, or renamed something like Tipitaka tablets at Kuthodaw Pagoda. -Spinoff 07:57, 18 December 2016 (UTC)

Page images[edit]

It is shock for me, that there is no digital images of all pages in the internet Arsen.Shnurkov (talk) 10:18, 12 June 2012 (UTC)

Merge with Kuthodaw Pagoda[edit]

Since these tablets are permanently installed as a feature within the pagoda, it may be best to give a large, devoted section to the tablets in the Kuthodaw Pagoda article. However, perhaps having its own article would serve it better (depending upon if other interested editors can bring source material and expertise).Spinoff 21:11, 11 February 2017 (UTC)