Talk:Tsushima dialect

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(first 3 threads moved from Talk:Japanese dialects)

something doesn't match[edit]

Look for the part where it says "chingu".

It reads in kanji「親友」, but in roomaji "tomodachi".

The kanji is "shin'yuu" meaning "best friend".

But the roomaji means "friend", the kanji being「友達」.

The English is "best friend".

Can someone check this and find out what "chingu" means? "Friend" or "Best friend"? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by KevinJr42 (talkcontribs) 14:19, 6 January 2007 (UTC).

Korea[edit]

The geographical location, Human migration, Histoical connection between Korea and Japan. It cleary shows that Korean cultural influence was very very strong in Tsushima. All these years Japanese nationalist tried to claim that " Tsushima Island was unique Japanese Island". In reality it was Uniguely Korean island. Korean traditional cultural sphere in Japan always have been ( Tsushima, Kyushu, Honshu ( Kansai area), Shikoku island). Lets not deny Korean cultural contribution to Tsushima. Koreans claiming Tsushima island as part of Korea. Its truely understandable. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Bostonasia (talkcontribs) 03:29, 6 February 2008 (UTC)

Limited Korean influence[edit]

I will remove a sentence and a table, which were added by Whlee (talk · contribs)[1]:

Due to historical reasons and the geographical proximity of Korea, Tsushima-ben has borrowed many words from Korean.

This is misleading. What is really worth noting is quite the opposite, almost total lack of Korean influence.

Since Tsushima was a point of strategic importance, scholars were rarely allowed to conduct field work. Before formal research, they had speculated that the Tsushima dialect may have been influenced by the Korean language, due to the geographical proximity of Korea[1].

[1] Ogura Shinpei 小倉進平: Kokugo tokuni Tsushima hōgen ni oyoboshita Chōsen go no eikyō 國語特に對馬方言に及ぼした朝鮮語彙の影響, Hōgen 方言, Vol.2 No.7, pp. 1-21, 1932.

Finally, the Linguistic Society of Japan, with several other academic societies, conducted full-scale research in 1950 and 1951, and they were surprised that Korean had virtually no influence on the Tsushima dialect[2][3][4]. All they could find was a couple of Korean loanwords, and they were used with clear awareness of their foreign origin.

[2] Izui Hisanosuke 泉井久之助: Tsushima hōgen no goi 對馬方言の語彙, Tsushima no sizen to bunka 對馬の自然と文化, pp. 105-106, 1954.
[3] Horii Reiichi 堀井令以知: Tsushima hōgen no goi 対馬方言の語彙, Chiiki shakai no gengo bunka 地域社会の言語文化, pp. 248-257, 1988.
[4] Horii Reiichi 堀井令以知: Tsushima hōgen 1950 nen no kenkyū 対馬方言1950年の調査研究 (A Research on the Tsushima Dialect), Kaisai Gaikokugo Daigaku Kenkyū Ronshū 関西外国語大学研究論集, No. 73, pp. 171-187, 2001.

As a result, it ceased to be a topic of scholarly interest. There are some subsequent papers about the Tsushima dialect[5][6], but they ignore it.

[5] Okumura Mitsuo 奥村三雄: Tsushima hōgen no seikaku 対馬方言の性格 (Some characteristics of the Tsushima Dialect), Kyūshū Bunkashi Kenkyūsho Kiyō 九州文化史研究所紀要 (Bulletin of the Institute of Research in Kyushu Cultural History), No. 18, pp. 83-121, 1973.
[6] Okano Nobuko 岡野信子: Iki Tsushima no hōgen 壱岐・対馬の方言, Kyūshū chihō no hōgen 九州地方の方言, pp. 143-171, 1983.

I know one exception[7], but it is not from linguistics proper, and it focuses on only one word (kōkomo~kokomo, sweet potato) that was loaned from the northern Tsushima dialect to Korean dialects. In other words, it deals with the Tsushima dialect's influence on Korean, not vice versa.

[7] Fujii Shigetoshi 藤井茂利: Higashi Ajia hikaku gengoron 東アジア比較方言論, 2002.

--Nanshu (talk) 07:40, 20 November 2011 (UTC)

I agree with you.--Oeyama01:56, 12 March 2012 (UTC)