Talk:Uncle Tom's Cabin

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Featured article Uncle Tom's Cabin is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on May 20, 2007.
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Date Process Result
February 19, 2007 Good article nominee Listed
April 29, 2007 Peer review Reviewed
May 5, 2007 Featured article candidate Promoted
Current status: Featured article

Marie St Clare[edit]

Marie St Clare is a wonderfully drawn and memorable character. Surely she deserves a mention on this page? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.231.230.231 (talk) 01:33, 7 August 2012 (UTC)

Wasn't she a pain though? I must certainly be in a minority, but I found her to be the most despicable character in the story. For all of Simon Legree's brutality, at least he made no pretensions to moral ascendancy. I have just added Marie to the character list.--Geometricks (talk) 10:15, 26 November 2014 (UTC)

Minor Correction Needed to Plot -- Eliza's Family Hunted[edit]

George did not "push Loker down a cliff," as stated. George shot and injured Loker in the side. However, "though wounded, he [Loker] would not retreat, but, with a yell like that of a mad bull, he was leaping right across the chasm into the party." Loker was pushed into the chasm by Phineas Fletcher, a converted Quaker traveling with George and Eliza, with Phineas saying, "Friend, thee isn't wanted here." Uncle Tom's Cabin, Chapter XVII. This is something of a minor error that someone might want to correct. (I happened to look at the Wikipedia article after having just finished reading the book.) RoseHawk (talk) 15:36, 17 August 2014 (UTC) Since I am commenting anyway, the description of George Harris really needs to be expanded a little. While not one of the principle characters, he is certainly an important character. George decides to run away to Canada before Eliza does similar. George is running away to escape a cruel master; Eliza, to maintain the integrity of her family (i.e., keep her child from being sold). Also, a very minor typographic in sub-section describing Augustine St. Claire: At one point his last name is incorrectly stated simply as "Claire." RoseHawk (talk) 16:21, 17 August 2014 (UTC)

I intend to look into the novel to make the necessary plot corrections. I hope this will help.Mike Tem (talk) 06:02, 3 November 2015 (UTC)

I made the plot correction you noticed, I hope it was to your liking. Mike Tem (talk) 08:46, 7 December 2015 (UTC)

Why Uncle Tom's Cabin is effective as an anti-slavery writing[edit]

Harriet Beecher Stowe was a white female author. These biological and racial facts alone make her novel work as an abolitionist piece. Kerry Sinanan expresses in her essay “The Slave narrative and the Literature of Abolition” that critics that did not believe the stories in slave narratives. It was difficult for slave authors, such as Fredrick Douglass, to put emotion into his writing because then people would not believe it or think it was true. It was easier for Stowe to write about the emotion that went along with slavery because she was separated from it. It is clear what emotions that the scenes in the novel try to elicit from the reader. In Sinanan’s essay the difference between what Stowe was able to do in comparison to the authors of slave narratives is perfectly high lighted in the quote: “This openly deliberate manipulation of the reader is denied to the slave who must appear as the objective recorder of facts, despite his/her personal invested in the narrative. Arguably, this mode of realistic narration in the slave narrative creates a distance between narrator and reader, for the slave’s story is unremittingly outside the white reader’s experience” (Sinanan 73). As stated, there is considerably less distance between the author and the reader in Uncle Tom’s Cabin because Harriet Beecher Stowe identifies with the reader. Neither she nor the reader really experienced slavery, so there is a connection and understanding. She can say whatever she pleases in terms of emotions that go along with slavery and will not be as questioned by the reader, simply because she is white and her work is fiction. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Alexabluffton2 (talkcontribs) 01:16, 19 April 2015 [1]

Semi-protected edit request on 19 April 2015[edit]

Please add: Stowe's novel works as anti-slavery piece of literature because she is a white female.“This openly deliberate manipulation of the reader is denied to the slave who must appear as the objective recorder of facts, despite his/her personal invested in the narrative. Arguably, this mode of realistic narration in the slave narrative creates a distance between narrator and reader, for the slave’s story is unremittingly outside the white reader’s experience” (Sinanan 73). As stated, there is considerably less distance between the author and the reader in Uncle Tom’s Cabin because Harriet Beecher Stowe identifies with the reader.<ref group="Cambridge University Press">{{cite journal|last1=Sinanan|first1=Kerry|title=The Slave Narrative and the History of Abolition|journal=Cambridge University Press|date=2007|pages=61-78|accessdate=March 2015}}</ref> Alexabluffton2 (talk) 01:47, 19 April 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. Amortias (T)(C) 17:31, 20 April 2015 (UTC)

another theme- temperance?[edit]

perhaps it was just in my reading, but i would argue that due to the st clare character who is stabbed to death in a bar and depicted as inebriated earlier and assisted by tom and adolph also show that she,(Mz Stowe)was likely concerned with the temperance movement as well. Other negative depictions of alcohol show her depicting its use: drunken slave hunters, prue and slaveholders plying their slaves with alcohol (primarily legree giving liquor to emmeline, quimbo and sambo) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 198.49.6.225 (talk) 12:13, 15 May 2015 (UTC)

I aim to look into the novel to see if this theme can be identified and what specific instances in the story can support that. I hope this will help.Mike Tem (talk) 06:05, 3 November 2015 (UTC)

I was able to find proof of the temperance theme, it's much more subtle than the other themes but it is there. I hope my contribution fits well enough.Mike Tem (talk) 08:48, 7 December 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 14 June 2015[edit]

Category:Southern Gothic novels 76.88.98.65 (talk) 02:45, 14 June 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. Don't see any mention of "southern gothic" on this page, need to provide an authoritative source describing this book as such Cannolis (talk) 02:51, 14 June 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request (2/18/2016)[edit]

Note # 13 has a bad link.

Vollaro, Daniel R. (Winter 2009), Lincoln, Stowe, and the "Little Woman/Great War" Story: The Making, and Breaking, of a Great American Anecdote 30 (1), Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association

is available at http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.2629860.0030.104, not at http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/jala/30.1/vollaro.html. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ibaimendi (talkcontribs) 15:51, 18 February 2016 (UTC)

Non-Resistance and colonization[edit]

Accordingly to William Lloyd Garisson, the book "triumphantly exemplifies the nature, tendencies and results of Christian non-resistance" (march 26th 1852, The Liberator; http://utc.iath.virginia.edu/reviews/rere02at.html). This opinion is supported by Tolstoy who quote the work as "a truly religious piece of art" (free translation from French).

Beecher Stowe had declined an invitation of Garrison to be present at an annual meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society. It seems that she was supporting the plans of the Colonization Society (her father was Reverend Lyman Beecher); an important topic at that time.

More importantly, Garisson asked her to clarify whether she considered that non-resistance was only for the black people - http://fair-use.org/the-liberator/1853/12/23/uncle-toms-cabin-reconsidered - (Harriett's brother gave his name to "Beecher's Bible", which are rifles). I thing the subject is worth mentioning; she presented escape and Christian non-resistance as valuable for the blacks; as for the whites, to help escape, buy black persons and give legal (emancipation) papers is ok, but for them, non-resistance is not considered, which is remarkable since large parts of the book is built around becoming Christian, and pro-slavery laws are well presented as anti-Christians; in fact the problem of the law - she said - was that it offered no legal advantage to the slave, even when the masters were "good masters", for they might die and they may be sold to other masters. So despite this emergency of life and death, with the Judgment Day ahead, and the existing unjust laws, the book did not address directly the question of Christian non-resistance for the whites: for if a slaveholder had become a Christian non-resistant... he would necessarily have let go free his slaves immediately. In brief, non-resistance is a major subject of the book, and the question of Garisson was essential... http://mselephantgun.com/blog/2013/5/20/6rmh8aoj1e651boordkg4t42cbzji2 AndWater (talk) 06:03, 17 March 2016 (UTC)

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  1. ^ Sinanan, Kerry (2007). ""The Slave Narrative and the Literature of Abolition."". Cambridge University Press: 61-78.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help);