Talk:Vandalic language

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rather[edit]

Rather than edit the article on "Vandalic language," it might more helpful to add to it. Vandalic was an East Germanic language, closely related, as you pointed out to Gothic. It was the language of the Vandals which left southern Skandinavia in the 200's BCE moved through what is today eatern Germany and Poland to Silesia. Here the Vandals split with one group under the dominant family of the Silings remaining in Silesia and the other, under the dominant family of the Asdings, continuing on to the area of the river Theiss in northern Hungary and eastern Slovakia.

Both Vandal groups eventually reunited when they migrated across Germany (central Germany in the case of the Silings and southern Germany in the case of the Asdings) and crossed into the Roman Empire at Mainz across the river Rhine. SWhile this was not the first time that at least the Asdings had invaded Roman territory, this one turned out to be a permanent invasion. The Vandals never again left the Roman Empire and played a dominant part in the fall of the Western part.

The Vandalic language moved with its speakers through today's France, then through Spain and finally across the Straits of Gibraltar to North Africa and specifically to Carthage.

Little is indeed left of the language but a few personal names. The best known one is Geiserich or Gaiseric or even Genserich, the Vandals' king for nearly 50 years in the 5th Century C.E.. 02:16, 29 Oct 2003

does anyone know?[edit]

Does anyone know if there are traces of this language in the Arabic or Berber dialects of North Africa? 18:46, 13 Feb 2005

the phrase in the Latin poem...[edit]

...is, when one looks beyond the spelling, completely identical to Gothic, and the verse mentions Goths. How then do we know it is Vandalic, not Gothic what we read? Caesarion 20:32, 10 December 2005 (UTC)

The attribution is "probable" because the poem was written in Vandalic North Africa about the locals. --Henrygb 12:33, 14 December 2005 (UTC)
Ok, that's clear then. Caesarion 15:39, 14 December 2005 (UTC)
If this sentence was written in 390 AD in North Africe it CAN NOT be Vandalic as they settled there after 429 AD.

The omitted passage is reproduced below for reference. --Eastlaw (talk) 05:43, 6 April 2008 (UTC)

A fragment of Vandalic appears in the somewhat snobbish Latin

poem de conviviis barbaris, dating to ca. 390:

Inter eils Goticum scapiamatziaiadrincan
non audet quisquam dignos educere versus.
("among the Gothic eils scapiamatziaiadrincan,
  one does not dare to produce dignified verse.")

The Vandalic part is comprehensible, and would correspond to Gothic hails! skapjam matjan jah drigkan!, i.e. "Hail! let us get some food and drink!".

Is there any direct attestation of the Vandalic writing system? The transcription looks as though it could well have been influenced by Latin orthography, for which "ia" would be identical to "ja". In Gothic, for example, drincan is written drigkan, where the "k" of Gothic is equivalent to the "c" of Latin of that era (which was pronounced "k"). --50.67.247.221 (talk) 01:04, 29 September 2015 (UTC)

Andalusian dialect[edit]

Only a small number of personal names of Vandalic language are known. Some traces may remain in Andalusian, the southernmost Spanish dialect.

Highly unlikely, because: 1. Vandals settled there for several years only (less than 20 years), than moved to Africa. How could they leave any influence in the dialect? If there is any influence of Vandalic in any language I would point out Polish or Slovakian rather than any dialect of Spanish. 2. The region was part of Visigothic state for almost 300 years. Their language was very similar to Vandalic (two dialects of the same language rather than separate languages). If there are any germanic traces in this dialect they are much more likely to pass from Gothic than Vandalic. 3. Romanized (Mozarab) population of Andalusia was expelled by Arabs after 1250 and this area was entirely Arabic-speaking untill was resettled by population from north. Yeti 20:40, 15 December 2005 (UTC)

they left, if nothing else, their imprint on the name of the county itself, al-Andalus, the land of the Vandals. dab () 20:38, 15 March 2006 (UTC)

Froia arme![edit]

Where exactly is Froia arme! attested? If it's one of only two pieces of recorded Vandalic outside of names, I'd think its source would be pretty important to add to the article. --Ptcamn 10:29, 4 October 2006 (UTC)

I agree with Ptcamn. Not only a source for Frioa arme, but also for the rest of the article. Everyone states that Gothic and Vandalic were similiar, but I have yet to read any solid primary sources about it.

Wends language[edit]

Vandalic was a Germanic language. Wends was a Slavic language: Prekmurian language. The term Wends or Wendish is general and used in Germanic languages for Slavs living near or within Germanic (later German) settlement areas after the migration period as some perceive, particularly and usually between rivers Elbe and Oder.--95.250.48.36 (talk) 18:03, 9 December 2010 (UTC)

But the article also pinpoint, that the Prekmurians not Vandalic descents. Far from it the Prekmurian is Vandalic-German language. Doncsecztalk 19:19, 9 December 2010 (UTC)

Why did Vandalic get extinct in the sixth century?[edit]

Why did Vandalic get extinct as early as the sixth century? As far as I understand the Slavic migrations into the area where they lived only started about this time. I would have thought it would have taken more time for them to become assimilated by the new groups. --Oddeivind (talk) 19:45, 1 June 2015 (UTC)