Talk:Vibrating structure gyroscope

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In the section "Spacecraft orientation", the article says that a "hemi-spherical resonator gyro" (like the one pictured in the linked Northrop Grumman page), provides "accurate 3 axis positioning of the spacecraft".

This is ambiguous! (or at least unclear). Does this literally mean that the gyro can be used to turn the spacecraft (*change* its attitude)? Or can it only be used to *detect* the spacecraft's attitude? (Leaving the actual maneuvering up to thrusters, for example).

Both techniques can be done with traditional, large-scale spinning gyros, but the difference between a detector and an actuator gyro is large in terms of mass and moment of inertia required.

It's easy to imagine that a tiny vibrating gyro can provide attitude detection, but if it can provide adequate turning force for a big spacecraft like Cassini, that would be very remarkable (and hence should be remarked on ;-) ).

Otherwise, the text should be edited to correctly indicate that the gyro provides attitude sensing only.

++RE: (*change* its attitude)? Or can it only be used to *detect* the spacecraft's attitude? (Leaving the actual maneuvering up to thrusters, for example)

Of course *detect* ,but one should know that the attitude control sys. nowadays usually intergreated with *detect* and signal output for *change* in one chip.So maybe its not accurate,but it's not wrong.(ps. my poor english...holp you'll catch what i mean...:-)) For other bugs in 'Theory of Operation' the equ. is based on no damping force conditon.The actually one requares Laplace Transform to figure it out.But what i want to say is,for an encyclopedia tip its enough!It is a complexed one that you'll not intersted except your work related to this industry.....(ZT from CHN.)

This article is getting clogged with ads. I removed three links to data sheets which added nothing except a list of products you can buy. There is still one left (the NEC one), but it is the only example of a piezoceramic sensor on the page, so I am loathe to remove it, as it seems to add something. Maybe someone could find a less ad-oriented example of one of these?

Also, someone seems to have put in an extraneous paragraph explaining that tuning fork gyroscopes are nothing new. Except that nothing in the article speaks to how new any of the technologies are. This paragraph is completely out of place and looks like it was put there to serve those who filed the patent initially. It probably should be removed too. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Bollinger (talkcontribs) 21:04, 28 May 2009 (UTC)

Coriolis Vibratory Gyroscope (CVG)[edit]

This section has useful content, but most of it appears to have been copied verbatim, or nearly so, from the InnaLabs website (http://innalabs.com/index.php/dual-axis-cvg-g200.html). I'm not familiar with Wikipedia's rules for copying from commercial sites, so perhaps somebody who is can make a ruling on this. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Markj99 (talkcontribs) 09:03, 20 July 2012 (UTC)

MEMS gyroscope[edit]

This sentence doesn't make sense: "They are distinguish micro gyros implemented microelectronics-type group technologies of silicon or similar materials, and miniature lower-cost gyros." I'd rewrite it, but I have no idea what it's trying to say. --202.124.96.194 (talk) 09:05, 19 September 2010 (UTC)

I agree with the comment above, although I'd speculate that the original writer's intention may have been to indicate that micro-gyroscopes might be produced either through lithography or through more traditional microfabrication techniques. If so, the claim may be a bit misleading since "MEMS gyroscope" seems to be equated with "lithographic IC" in common use. I have refreshed this section with some information from the Bernstein article in Sensors Weekly. NillaGoon (talk) 01:15, 4 October 2010 (UTC)

MEMS gyroscope[edit]

I would like to modify to include Epson Toyocom to the list as a major vendor in addition to ST, Analog Devices, Kionix, Invensense. The following is links to independent market research firm reports from Yole and iSuppli that analyze the MEMs market and key players.

http://www.i-micronews.com/news/Gaming-market-reveals-changes-MEMS-gyroscope-competitive-la,5711.html

http://memsblog.wordpress.com/2010/06/01/shifts-occurring-in-the-mems-competitive-landscape/

http://www.i-micronews.com/news/MEMS-quartz-components-contribute-Siwards-revenues-2011,6172.html

http://memsblog.wordpress.com/2010/02/02/isuppli-2009%E2%80%94the-hockey-stick-year-for-mems/

http://memsblog.wordpress.com/2009/12/07/kionix-sale-for-233-0-million-to-rohm-in-a-booming-consumer-electronics-mems-inertial-market/

http://memsblog.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/3-axis-gyroscope-the-new-killer-product-for-cell-phones/


Also a link to a scientific research paper about the use of Epson MEMS gyro for use in robotics and a analysis of its properties.

Minimal-Drift Heading Measurement using a MEMS Gyro for Indoor Mobile Robots

Any thoughts and opinons are welcome. Further I would like to add a branch from the article to separate MEMs gyroscope to Si-MEMs gyroscope and Quartz MEMs gyroscope, since they have different core materials and thus trade offs for performance.

I was asked by Ronz to put it in the discussion for review by others.

Rc604 (talk) 18:23, 31 March 2011 (UTC)