Talk:Viral video

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Sections removed from article[edit]

I have removed the following two sections from the article because I think there are problems (the first has little to say about viral videos in particular, it's mostly just about campaigning and mudslinging; the second is all original research/original analysis). I would welcome some outside opinions on what to do with them. Also, I should note these additions were written for a class project.

2008 Presidential Campaign

Barack Obama took advantage of viral videos during the 2008 United States presidential campaign. In a video conducted by Brookings, Darrell M. West predicted that "attack ads [would] play a prominent role in the 2008 election and that he expect[ed] the Democrats to fight back."[1] Although since the beginning of time attacking an opponent vigorously was admired, the 2008 Presidential Campaign showed that there is definitely a fine line. In an article regarding the inaccuracies of the advertisements presented by each opponent it was stated, “…the 2008 campaign has reached all-time lows in the use of misleading and inaccurate political appeals.”[2] The article further states that the Republican Party broadcasted an ad taking Barack Obama’s words out of context comparing Sarah Palin to a pig. On the other hand the Democratic Party was no saints either. In response to McCain securing the GOP nomination, the Democrats falsely accused the Republicans of supporting a 1,000-year war in Iraq. In this article West provides advice for the voters, “But the best thing for voters to do is to watch the candidates debates and judge for themselves.”[3] In addition the article provides interesting information about the financial spending towards campaign advertisements. It states, “By the time the campaign is over, the presidential candidates are expected to have spent 55 percent of their overall budget on ads.”[4] Although fifty-five percent is barely over half, one must consider that it was spent on only one, of an incessant amount, of responsibilities in a campaign. More specifics suggest, “John McCain’s campaign has spent almost $29 million since mid-May, and Barack Obama’s campaign spent almost $34 million sin June 20th.” [5]

Looking To the Future

When looking at the future of viral videos, one must take into consideration the other forms of technology or in this case other sub categories of Viral Marketing. One in particular to look at is viral applications. When looking at this comparison people of this generation who highly admire viral videos suggest that if looking in the future, viral applications will not be as prevalent as viral videos. Viral videos spread faster and broader than viral applications. Viral videos are shared by many viewers and viral applications can be used only on those who download the actual application. A viral application requires downloading which would involve an efficient internet provider. A viral application is limited because in order to use the application the correct operating system would need to be place. For example, some applications cannot be used with two different operating systems. Operating systems consists of Blackberry or Ipod Touch from Apple, which both provide specific applications.

Why "Viral" ?[edit]

The article fails to explain why these videos are refered to as "viral". Do they convey a computer virus to the viewer's computer when viewed or downloaded? Wouldn't they be blocked by antivirus software? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.95.43.249 (talk) 23:01, 20 June 2014 (UTC)

That's the same question I was going to ask --Marce 10:44, 10 July 2014 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Fandelasketchup (talkcontribs)

Susan Boyle[edit]

While fixing a Kony 2012 reference I noticed Susan Boyle reached 100 million views after only nine days, which is rather close to Kony 2012 attaining 100 million after six days. Maybe it would be a good idea to mention Susan Boyle? The nine days ref is here (see stats graphic): http://mashable.com/2012/03/12/kony-most-viral/

Perhaps it wouldn't hurt either to mention Lady Gaga's Bad Romance, which attained 100 million after 18 days, but then again you mention one and there is a tendency to mention all, which leads to Rebecca Black (Friday) attaining 100 million views after 45 days.

I think at least Susan Boyle should be mentioned.

149.254.51.158 (talk) 21:52, 26 March 2016 (UTC)

Jessi Slaughter[edit]

Jessi Slaughter, who is mentioned in this article as well as Stickam currently identifies as a non-binary transgender person named Damien Leonhardt who uses they/them pronouns. Should we update the name and pronouns used in these articles? --73.237.56.126 (talk) 03:30, 9 October 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ West, Darrell (August 27, 2008). "The 2008 Presidential Election Ad Wars" (Web interview). The Brooking Institution. Retrieved November 22, 2009. 
  2. ^ West, Darrell (September 16, 2008). "2008 Campaign Attack Ads Hit an All-Time Low" (Web). The Brooking Institution. Retrieved November 19, 2009. 
  3. ^ West, Darrell (August 27, 2008). "The 2008 Presidential Election Ad Wars" (Web interview). The Brooking Institution. Retrieved November 22, 2009. 
  4. ^ West, Darrell (August 27, 2008). "The 2008 Presidential Election Ad Wars" (Web interview). The Brooking Institution. Retrieved November 22, 2009. 
  5. ^ Woodruff, Judy (August 07, 2008). "Examining the Negative 2008 Presidential Campaign Ads" (Web interview). The Brooking Institution. Retrieved November 21, 2009.  Check date values in: |date= (help)