Talk:Vortex generator

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Aviation / Aircraft (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of the Aviation WikiProject. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see lists of open tasks and task forces. To use this banner, please see the full instructions.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 
 
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the aircraft project.
WikiProject Physics / Fluid Dynamics  (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Physics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Physics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
This article is supported by Fluid Dynamics Taskforce.
 

Drag crisis[edit]

I'm rusty on my fluids, but isn't there some relationship between vortex generators and drag crisis? —Ben FrantzDale (talk) 00:42, 24 October 2008 (UTC)

A bump?[edit]

"A vortex generator (VG) is an aerodynamic surface, consisting of a small vane or bump that creates a vortex" What kind of bump?! — Preceding unsigned comment added by Arrivisto (talkcontribs)

I checked both refs cited and neither supports the inclusion of that term. The Peppler ref (a paper book) only mentions "vanes", and the the Micro AeroDynamics website ref does not describe the device used, although I know from experience that their kits only provide vanes, so I removed the word "bump". This can be added back in if anyone has a ref to support that! - Ahunt (talk) 12:08, 28 May 2013 (UTC)
One of the models of Learjet has vortex generators that aren't vanes. However, I wouldn't call them bumps; small rectangular blocks, perhaps. Learjet merely calls them "vortex generators". I agree that, in the absence of a reliable published source, we should only refer to vanes. Dolphin (t) 13:21, 28 May 2013 (UTC)

Generator types[edit]

Aren't leading edge extensions and fixed canards such as on Swiss Dassault Mirage IIIs and IAI Kfirs considered vortex generators, to aid in maintaining lift at higher AOAs and/or lower speeds? In fact, I thought that the leading section on a delta wing acted as a vortex generator in itself, maintaining high energy air flow over the top of the wing at high AOA. This article seems to give a pretty limited idea of what forms a vortex generator can take. It isn't always a vane on the top of a wing, and it isn't always something separate from the wing. Seems to me that anything that generates a vortex is a vortex generator..45Colt 21:24, 30 April 2014 (UTC)

True, if we have refs we can add more types of VGs! - Ahunt (talk) 21:32, 30 April 2014 (UTC)
Agree; vortilons, leading edge extensions, DLE or cuffs, a lot of strakes, even wing fences are all VG. Colt remark leads to a "Vortex generating devices" article. Plxdesi2 (talk) 12:50, 26 May 2014 (UTC)

Cessna 182 image[edit]

Call me dense, but I can't clearly see anything on the wing that might be a vorext generator, never mind clearly enough to identify its key features. Could the image be changed, or the feature highlighted more clearly? 148.88.244.37 (talk) 00:22, 11 June 2014 (UTC)

It seems pretty clear to me, especially when you click on the photo and enlarge it. They are all arrayed in a line on the leading edge. - Ahunt (talk) 18:19, 12 June 2014 (UTC)

Poor Language[edit]

"Vortex generators are most often used to delay flow separation. To solve this problem, ..." The use of Vortex Generators is not the problem. Neither is the delay of flow separation. Re-word of the second sentence is recommended. Linuxslate (talk) 16:19, 4 May 2015 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done - Ahunt (talk) 16:50, 4 May 2015 (UTC)