Talk:Waterfall plot

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Merge With Spectrogram[edit]

A waterfall plot is essentially a spectrogram. The terms are interchangable. I suggest that these two wiki pages should be merged. A waterfall plot can be 2D with color being the third dimension. A spectrogram can also be a 3D display. Confusing terminology for all the same thing. (Spectrogram 04:38, 30 April 2006 (UTC))

While I agree that they carry the same information, I'm not sure they're the same. From my limited knowledge, a waterfall plot is merely a type of 3D plot that is often used to display freq. response vs. time. Check http://www.caspur.it/risorse/softappl/doc/matlab_help/techdoc/ref/waterfall.html for details. Weston.pace 19:30, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

I have updated the information and clarified it enough that I believe it no longer needs to be merged. Weston.pace 21:27, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

A waterfall plot is a spectrogram that moves in the vertical direction. The key thing is that it is live data. You can't print it on paper. It is commonly used for viewing C/MT Hellschreiber transmissions. If this image were animated, it'd be a waterfall plot. AlbertCahalan 20:52, 10 September 2007 (UTC)
No, there is no requirement for a waterfall plot to show "live data" (though live data can of course be plotted in this manner). Weston.page is correct, however: there is a critical difference between a spectrogram and a waterfall plot - they are not the same thing at all.  — Mike.lifeguard | @en.wb 00:42, 25 March 2009 (UTC)
A spectrogram is a diferent animal where I come from. The data is the same but the presentation is different, and usually a spectrogram has a bit more processing.Greglocock (talk) 02:46, 19 November 2012 (UTC)

Lede[edit]

Hands up everyone who thinks that a waterfall plot looks like a waterfall. I certainly don't. Greglocock (talk) 02:46, 19 November 2012 (UTC)

Two-dimensional waterfall plots in clinical trials[edit]

Hi, a quite different type of (2D) plot is also called waterfall plot. Literature examples: "A waterfall plot is an ordered histogram where each patient is represented by a single vertical bar [...]. It displays the magnitude of individual patients’ responses to treatment as a percent change in measurements of their tumor(s) from baseline [...]." (from JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Volume 106, Issue 12, 1 December 2014, dju331, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/dju331) or "In oncology, for example, a waterfall plot may be used to present each individual patient’s response to a particular drug based on a parameter, such as tumor burden. The horizontal (x) axis across the plot may serve as a baseline measure; vertical bars are drawn for each patient, either above or below the baseline. The vertical (y) axis may be used to measure maximum percent change from baseline, e.g., percent growth or reduction of the tumor by radiologic measurement." (from J Adv Pract Oncol. 2012 Mar-Apr; 3(2): 106–111. PMCID: PMC4093310). --Biologos (talk) 15:28, 1 December 2017 (UTC)