Talk:Watt balance

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...same way that the speed of light is defined by the definition of the meter... I suppose, it should be "meter is defined by the definition of speed of light"...?

Diagram[edit]

Metrology in the balance fig 3 has a good schematic diagram of a Watt balance. Also discusses recent accuracies. Rod57 (talk) 01:20, 28 March 2011 (UTC)

Improvement over Ampere Balance[edit]

The article says the watt balance is better than the ampere balance because there's no need to measure distances. But the calibration of the watt balance requires measurement of speed ('v' in the article). And I would naively think measuring speed means measuring distance.

I'm sure there's an well known explanation but I would've liked to see it in the article. LegendLength (talk) 09:23, 5 October 2012 (UTC)

U vs V[edit]

U is traditionally used for potential ENERGY, not potential difference aka Voltage V. The use of the outdated term "Potential Difference" and the symbol U in this context creates a huge amount of confusion in introductory and even advanced physics. We should use Voltage and V in this article to avoid the same issue. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.183.128.65 (talk) 18:01, 28 November 2016 (UTC)