Talk:Whakatane

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject New Zealand (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject New Zealand, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of New Zealand and New Zealand-related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Cities (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Cities, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of cities, towns and various other settlements on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Toi traditions[edit]

Just a note that more research may be needed to make sure that the Toi tradition presented here is authentic, and not the version constructed by ethnologists of the late 19th-early 20th century, like S. Percy Smith and Best. Just from memory, I think that in the authentic traditions there are two Toi - one who never left Hawaiki, and another who was always in Aotearoa. Smith or people like him combined the Toi/Whatonga traditions with the Kupe traditions to produce a version in which Toi came to NZ, having heard of Kupe's discoveries; a sequence not attested in genuine traditions. Kahuroa 06:57, 24 August 2006 (UTC)

This is correct. Rongowhakaata Halbert has clarified the situation considerably in his book Horouta (see article on Opotiki for citation, ISBN etc), which is much more complicated than that stated above. But even before this recent work, J. Roberton published similar research in the Journal of the Polynesian Society and Alf Lyall also. I'm afraid this is not the only case where McLintock's Encyclopaedia is erroneous, I am astonished anyone still uses it. MisterCDE 04:52, 21 May 2007 (UTC)

Yeah, I think David Simmons debunked this as part of his analysis of the Kupe trads - but that would have been after McLintock was published. Unfortunately it has probably been incorporated in local myths. How shall we rewrite it? Kahuroa 06:26, 21 May 2007 (UTC)

Natural Disasters[edit]

The 2004 flooding and 1987 Edgecumbe earthquake could possibly be included under a geography/natural disasters heading. Does anyone have any objections? (Benjamin J Melville 03:56, 4 December 2007 (UTC))