Talk:Wind power in the United States

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Meteorolgy section - temp removal for editing discussion[edit]

 ==Wind energy meteorology==

The boundary layer wind, e.g. 100 m wind, is controlled by the wind condition in free atmosphere, perturbed by fast varying turbulence in the boundary layer. Strong winds in the free atmosphere lead to strong boundary layer winds near the surface, and consequently high instantaneous values for the capacity factors of wind turbines. The problem with the output from a single wind farm located in any particular region is that it is variable on time scales ranging from minutes to days posing difficulties for incorporating relevant outputs into an integrated power system. The high frequency variability of contributions from individual wind farms is determined mainly by locally generated small scale boundary layer. The low frequency variability is associated with the passage of transient waves in the atmosphere with a characteristic time scale of several days.[1] Moreover, the Central Plains region of US is under the influence of the large scale metrological transient waves. Electricity generated by one wind farm located in the Central Plains region is not independent of the electricity output from another wind facility in the same region.[1]

First of all, to my knowledge, there is no such thing as instantaneous capacity factors. This does not make sense. [EDIT: Actually it does, now that I've thought about it more.] Secondly, the phenomena which is being discussed doesn't appear to be specific to the United States. Hence the information may be better suited to the more general article Wind Power. Thirdly - the information in the paragraph(and possibly the article) seems merely to say that the output from wind farms in a region is correlated and not independent. This is not new info. and is mentioned in the Wind power article. It could be mentined in this article as well. Aflafla1 (talk) 04:27, 24 October 2014 (UTC

Ok, the following is my proposed revised text:
Winds in the Central plains region of the U.S. are variable on both short (minutes) and long (days) time scales. Variations in wind speed result in variations in power output from wind farms, which poses difficulties incorporating wind power into an integrated power system. Wind turbies are driven by boundary layer winds, those that occur near the surface of the earth, at around 300 feet. Boundry layer winds are controlled by wind in the higher free atmosphere and have turbulence due to interaction with surface features such as trees, hills, and buildings. Short term or high frequency variations are due to this turbulence in the boundary layer. Long term variations are due to the passage of transient waves in the atmosphere, with a characteristic time scale of several days.
The transient waves ar that influence wind in the Central U.S. are large scale and this results in the power output from wind farms in the region being correlated and not independent.

March 17, 2015 update[edit]

The update looks good except they took out the monthly generation data for 2002 and 2003 — Preceding unsigned comment added by Renewablejunkie (talkcontribs) 05:41, 31 March 2015 (UTC)

Removal of paragraph about U. of Utah report from lead[edit]

I had several problems with the paragraph as it was in this article. First it did not belong in the lead section. Instead the info should have been placed at the end of the Overview section where it would flow more naturally.

Secondly I don't like how the paragraph was worded. Instead, write a paragraph about the wind cost estimates being too high and use the report as the cite.

Thirdly, it has been widely discussed that this report was essentially funded by oil and gas industry interests. Professor Simmons' chair at the Utah university is funded by a Koch Brothers foundation.--Aflafla1 (talk) 03:01, 8 July 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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I have just added archive links to one external link on Wind power in the United States. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

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Question? Archived sources still need to be checked

Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 07:10, 20 January 2016 (UTC)

Edits concerning wind energy subsidies[edit]

The following text has been repeatedly added by user Vgy7ujm

The U.S. Department of Energy also reported that, for fiscal year 2013, wind power in the United States received $5.936 billion in federal subsidies and supports, or 37% of all subsidies and supports for electricity production. This figure does not include state and local spending.


and has been repeadedly removed with the reason given as:

This number was not true when it first appeared and it still isn't true. 5billion/37billion is not 40%. Additionally, over 90% of this amount was due to a ARRA, and wasn't ongoing. This does not need to be put as some kind of ananchrnous counterpoint.
  • Added Jan 21,2016, removed Jan 21, 2016
  • Added Nov. 10, 2015, removed 25 Dec, 2015
  • Added Oct. 24, 2013 and removed Oct 30, 2013

--Aflafla1 (talk) 01:53, 23 January 2016 (UTC)

I primarily object to two things 1)The information being in the lead instead of the body of the article, and 2)the tone of the addition, which is POV. The 37% number is correct for direct subsidies, though.

The topic of the federal Production Tax Credit and Investment tax credit received by wind is a very notable omission from the article. I've been considering adding a section on this for some time, and consolidating what sparse information is in the article regarding the PTC into the section. It needs to be mentioned that the amount of the credit reached like $24 / megawatt hour, which is considerable, especially in light that wholesale prices of electricity average like $55 - $60 / megawatt hour in the central region of the U.S. Also should mention that wind farm construction would stop when the credit expired because developers thought it reasonably likely the credit would be reinstated, and delaying the development of a wind farm until the subsidy was again in effect was a wise business decision. Aflafla1 (talk) 03:45, 23 January 2016 (UTC)

I have moved this topic into the body of the article and added a mention of the ARRA. The EIA report goes into considerable detail about how the ARRA and PTC affected the report. When the EIA issues its next report on subsidies in a few years, the ARRA can be left behind, but this article needs some information about subsidies so that taxpayers realize how much of their money has gone into windfarms. It must also be made clear that the figures are limited to federal supports. As for tone, the entire article has a pro-wind POV. It lacks a balanced view about the cost effectiveness of wind power.Vgy7ujm (talk) 07:31, 23 January 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to one external link on Wind power in the United States. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

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Question? Archived sources still need to be checked

Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 23:19, 22 February 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ a b Junling Huang and Michael B. McElroy (2014). "Meteorologically defined limits to reduction in the variability of outputs from a coupled wind farm system in the Central US". Renewable Energy 62: 331–340.