Talk:Windshield washer fluid

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Opening heading[edit]

I removed some how-to prank information as it seemed very non-encyclopedic. If anyone feels strongly about it, feel free to rewrite/repost/whathaveyou. --Interiot 22:19, 17 April 2006 (UTC)

Corrected all the "You have to..." "You can buy..." off the page. I think it can be de-tagged now...

Dilution[edit]

I've been using windshield washer fluid for many years now and have heard nothing about dilution. I'd like to know the source of this statement. JohnCub 13:02, 25 January 2007 (UTC)

Perhaps this is something that is done in Europe but not in the US? I know this isn't the most thrilling topic in the world but I'd like for someone to confirm or source the mix with water theory before I get all high and mighty and remove the information. JohnCub 02:24, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
Here in Northern Europe the fluid is often sold without or with only little added water. Depending on temperatures encountered, we mix 1:8 (washer fluid : water when it's not freezing) to 1:1 (which stays liquid down to -20 Celsius or even colder if it's methanol based). The mild mix is mostly enough to keep the window clean, stinks less and is, if only marginally, cheaper. 82.181.53.181 (talk) 14:51, 21 May 2009 (UTC)
I'm not sure about the dillution thing, JohnCub, but its probably because of the solid crystals some use (shown in the pics) since solids require dillution. I kept it in but modified the first paragraph to indicate that - at least in the US - most fluid solutions are premixed --Flybrian 04:58, 26 March 2007 (UTC) Back in the mid 1960s, when I started driving, dilutable washer fluids were commonly available in local outlets. (I vaguely recall an earlier era when they were dominant.) In hindsight this offers an excellent example of a time before fast everything, when good sense prevailed over "convenience." Why the unnecessary expenditures on packaging, manpower and fuel toting around something as commonly available as water? And yes, the user adjusted the dilution factor according to the season. [[[User:Bashou303|bloom]] 01:46, 9 July 2007 (UTC)]

PAV?[edit]

What's PAV? Could use a clarification. --Dylanfly 04:17, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

I'm having trouble finding it anywhere...unless it's some kind of exotic, electrically conductive polymer. I'm guessing the author meant PVA, polyvinyl alcohol.--128.115.27.10 17:32, 19 September 2007 (UTC)

CRITICAL VIEWS and futures[edit]

Hello folks, I've really jumped in with some debate about windshield wiper fluid and a pile of academic references. Give me a holler if you have any concerns. Cheers, --Dylanfly 04:18, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

Windshield washer fluid for the 21st century[edit]

I have a problem with the last section of this heading.

However, a simple solution, amenable to all parties already exists. Many people have proposed the use of a mild fluid during warm months (and in warm climates) when there is no chance of freezing temperatures. A more satisfactory and lasting solution would be to formulate a cheap, effective, non-toxic formula.

This is akin to saying that cheap and non toxic energy is the best answer to global warming. Sure, its true, but it doesn't reflect the reality of chemistry. If there were a cheap, effective, and non-toxic windshield washer fluid then some company would already be marketing it. As with most problems, performance and price diverge.

I'd like to remove it, but since I'm new to this whole wikipedia editing thing I'm going to hold off. —Preceding unsigned comment added by T3arlach (talkcontribs) 15:08, 20 December 2007 (UTC)

Ethanol would be perfect, except that we tax it to discourage addicts from drinking it. For winter conditions, add a spark plug. :-) 24.170.165.214 (talk) 04:37, 2 January 2011 (UTC)
Ethanol could be denatured and still be effective as windshield washer fluid. H Padleckas (talk) 09:10, 2 January 2011 (UTC)
Thanks for the comment. With all due respect, I think your view of the capitalist marketplace is somewhat naive--the market does not necessarily produce the best possible product. The capitalist marketplace is subject to drift, chance, monopolization, cultural inertia, etc. Until there is widespread public concern about toxicity we probably won't see much movement on the part of the corporations who dominate the market for this product. Smilo Don (talk) 15:19, 21 December 2007 (UTC)

While the overly simplistic capitalist view I expressed may seem naive it would also be naive to assume that there is such a solution. While there are exceptions to every rule it is generally a good assumption that price and performance will diverge. Unless the answer is exceedingly simple and cheap you will be at a competitive disadvantage if only because you have research and development expenses to cover in the sale of your product.

Debate of market economics aside (as this is not the place), I still feel the last sentence is either not very encyclopedic (lack of supporting research or citation) or not clearly conveying its message and therefore should be removed. I would gladly cede this argument in the face of evidence that such a product existed, but a quick search for such research did not reveal any. A common environmentally friendly alternative to washer fluid frequently quoted is to use vinegar and water, but seeing as how acetic acid, the main component of vinegar, freezes at 16.5°C I do not think it would be effective in cold climates. Maybe there is an acceptable middle ground? T3arlach (talk) 00:13, 27 December 2007 (UTC)

A mixture of water and acetic acid is likely to have a freezing point lower than either one alone. 24.170.165.214 (talk) 04:37, 2 January 2011 (UTC)
Acetic acid has a rather lousy smell, in addition to being somewhat acidic. H Padleckas (talk) 09:10, 2 January 2011 (UTC)

how much is enough for damaging effects?[edit]

i got windshield fluid on my skin but wasnt able to wipe it off for 2 hours. it was only 6 drops or so from the windshield. Is that enough to cause severe damage? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 10kprm (talkcontribs) 22:25, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

It's only methyl alchohol. Alcohol. don't worry about it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Ericg33 (talkcontribs) 21:06, 11 August 2008 (UTC)

incorrect/false statement? drastic consequences[edit]

There's something wrong with this statement:

This is especially desired in colder climates where a thin layer of ice or frost accumulates on the windshield's surface, eliminating the need to manually scrape the windshield or pour warm water on the glass.

Most stories of dumping "warm water" on a windshield have ended tragically, either due to the window cracking, or completely shattering due to the extreme change of temperature (below zero/snow/ice) to extreme heat.

I've heard of people running garden hose water over their windshield on a cold day to alleviate fogged/iced windows. But dumping warm water on a cold/frozen glass windshield can't be good....can it? --67.34.188.252 (talk) 20:37, 11 January 2009 (UTC)

Flammability?[edit]

I was buying some windshield washer fluid the other day and noticed that it said that the contents are flammable. I was wondering just how flammable it was and if its safe to leave a bottle in the garage or just put it in the tank right away? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.121.46.142 (talk) 19:16, 31 July 2009 (UTC)

Although methanol is rather flammable, it is not extremely flammable. H Padleckas (talk) 09:16, 2 January 2011 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: Opposed - page not moved  Ronhjones  (Talk) 23:01, 15 April 2010 (UTC)



Windshield washer fluidWiper fluid — Modeled after inverse of unsuccessful move request here (as in, how it is there currently) to improve WP consistency among wording in articles. ₪— CelticWonder (T·C) " 20:30, 2 April 2010 (UTC)

  • Strong oppose per WP:ENGVAR and the fact that it follows the name of the main article here, windshield. Vegaswikian (talk) 21:51, 2 April 2010 (UTC)
  • Oppose it's "windshield wiper fluid" not "wiper fluid" 76.66.192.73 (talk) 06:48, 3 April 2010 (UTC)
  • Oppose I've always heard it called "windshield washer fluid". I've never heard "wiper fluid" used. H Padleckas (talk) 02:32, 6 April 2010 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Missing section about actual ingredients[edit]

Missing practical info.

In most places, you only find alcohol-free fluid for summer or for winter (down to -40oC. It would be nice to know what's in them. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.203.68.10 (talk) 04:51, 14 May 2010 (UTC)

Alcohol free formula is using antifreeze(ethylene glycol) in place of windshield washer fluid. It's mentioned in article. 85.254.64.36 (talk) 20:10, 23 December 2011 (UTC)

Legionnaire's disease? Seriously?[edit]

This sounds utterly ridiculous to me, but I am new and was not sure if I could delete it. I added a citation needed tag instead. There is no mention of windshield wiper fluid on the Legionellosis page on this wiki. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.110.137.254 (talk) 03:30, 25 June 2010 (UTC)

http://www.google.com/search?q=Legionnaires+disease+windshield+washer+fluid —Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.224.75.50 (talk) 23:10, 20 August 2010 (UTC)

Heated fluid - 2010 - GM 2nd Recall, to remove from 1.3 million vehicles[edit]

http://blogs.edmunds.com/strategies/2010/06/gm-recalls-15-million-vehicles-for-faulty-heated-washer-fluid-system.html For Release: June 8, 2010 GM Will Deactivate Heated Washer Fluid Systems Customers Will Receive $100 Voluntary Payment

DETROIT - General Motors Co. is recalling 1.5 million 2007-2009 model cars, trucks and crossovers to disable a heated washer fluid system module that could pose a fire risk. Because the feature will be disabled, GM will make a voluntary payment of $100 to the owner or lessee of each vehicle.

There are no known injuries or crashes related to the condition.

   ...  more.  —Preceding unsigned comment added by Grampadan (talkcontribs) 16:04, 23 August 2010 (UTC)