Talk:Xylitol

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Is it a natural product?[edit]

The article was not clear to me on the subject.

The article states that xylitol is naturally occurring. However, in the _production_ section, we have _Xylitol is produced by hydrogenation of xylose, which converts the sugar (an aldehyde) into a primary alcohol_.

So is it naturally occurring, but actually produced by synthesizing? And if so, is it a "natural product"? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 220.244.207.126 (talk) 11:51, 23 August 2012 (UTC)

As far as I understand, you are correct that it is naturally occurring but can also be produced by synthesizing. This, I believe, is fairly common, as you can get synthesized forms of many other naturally occurring compounds.

As for it is a "natural product", I'm not quite sure what you're asking. Is there a chemical difference between naturally occurring xyletol and synthesized xyletol? Well, no, because if it were different chemically, it would no longer be xyletol, but something else. Is there a difference between what trace impurities are mixed in with the purified xyletol? Probably. Is this difference significant? I don't know. What precisely do you mean by "natural product"? ~Adjwilley (talk) 18:38, 23 August 2012 (UTC)

The difference is significant to some people. Some people believe that synthesized vitamin C is not as good as extracts from fruit. But anyway, I feel answered. BTW is it xylitol or xyletol? my spell checker doesn't know either. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 220.244.207.126 (talk) 08:13, 24 August 2012 (UTC)

It's 'xylitol'. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Dbrdh (talkcontribs) 21:19, 20 February 2013 (UTC)

discussion of harmful doses[edit]

The article cites very low doses as being harmful in dogs (<1g/kg) yet cites daily doses as high as 430g as causing no ill effects in humans (about 6g/kg for an average adult). I suspect someone got a decimal place in the wrong spot (rather than dogs being somehow much more susceptible).

Reply: The difference between the canine and human species effects the way that either metabolize any substance. Dogs should not be given chocolate or onions also. We people are not so affected. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.50.163.187 (talk) 11:59, 10 June 2013 (UTC)

List of products with Xylitol (partial)[edit]

The following is a list of products that contain xylitol: Sourced from http://www.merrickvet.com/70723/6303.html

Orbit gum, Trident gum, Stride gum, Ice Breakers gum, Altoids, Biotene Mouthwash, Breath Rx, TheraBreath toothpaste & mouthwash, Tom's of Maine products, Mint Asure, FreshBreath capsules, Smint "xylicare" — Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.50.163.187 (talk) 12:08, 10 June 2013 (UTC)

Unsourced claim[edit]

"Unlike other natural or synthetic sweeteners, xylitol is actively beneficial for dental health by reducing caries to a third in regular use and helpful to remineralization" - This statement goes much further than what sources actually say. 83.7.147.9 (talk) 18:57, 16 September 2013 (UTC)

So, why hasn't it replaced sugar?[edit]

I'll presume all the stated benefits are true, but if it was the whole story, then the world would have abandoned sugar long ago. I'm guess there's information missing.

  • Per gram, is it much more expensive than sugar? (but, with all its benefits, the cost difference would have be huge to explain the lack of Xylitol-based sweets and confectionery)
  • Does it not taste as nice?
  • Does it give people wind? (The article mentions diarrhoea, but there must be intermediary effects between having diarrhoea and having no side effects)
  • Can it not be used in baking or other types of cooking? (this wouldn't explain why it isn't used in non-cooked or low-heat products)

Really, with so many benefits, and with the increase in research on the harms of sugar and obesity, I'm guess all four of those things are true, but even those four together isn't enough to explain why Xylitol isn't much, much, much more present.

Can anyone help make this article make sense? Gronky (talk) 16:12, 4 February 2014 (UTC)

At least for me, when I eat a lot of sugar I get a good feeling right afterwards, but I don't get that feeling from xylitol. --91.157.126.247 (talk) 15:37, 2 July 2014 (UTC)

"Bio-film buster"[edit]

xylitol is being used by many in the alternative health field as a bacterial "bio-film buster".

107.36.78.18 (talk) 02:54, 12 February 2015 (UTC)

You have a reference for that? Bwtranch (talk) — Preceding undated comment added 03:12, 12 February 2015 (UTC)

Sugar Conformation[edit]

I think there is a serious need to introduce pictures of the furanose and pyranose forms of Xylitol and other carbohydrates on wikipedia. The current chemical structure is the open chain form which is not the major form and misinforms readers or non-experts on the subject.

A good example would be the page on glucose with a good discussion on the different anomers as well as concomitant pictures. Does anyone have any advice for me before I go ahead and make changes?

Yogiholt (talk) 05:22, 9 April 2015 (UTC)

Are you talking about the 1,4-anhydro-D-xylitol form?

isotope32 (talk) 09:21, 14 May 2015 (UTC)