Talk:Zeaxanthin

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Comments[edit]

Some articles on antioxidants (external to Wikipedia) mention a chemical called "zeanthin", but they never say what the difference is between zeanthin and zeaxanthin. Is there any such chemical called "zeanthin", or is this a mispelling of Zeaxanthin? I've also seen other possible misspellings such as "zeathanin". N3362 15:11, 9 April 2006 (UTC)

These are really just misspellings. Icek 20:40, 13 March 2007 (UTC)

Cataracts[edit]

I formulated a keyword search on pub med as follows, but do not know which ones of these are best:

Google search on pub med for zeaxanthin OR lutein cataract Could someone look through the search results and pick something nice to use as a reference for the citation required tag in the article? check my talk page. Oldspammer (talk) 17:30, 6 July 2010 (UTC)

Contradiction with the lutein article[edit]

In this article it is written that there is insufficient evidence to suggest that supplementation with zeaxanthin and lutein lowers the risk of cataract formation; and thee is a study cited wich concludes so. In the article about lutein it is written that supplementation with lutein and zeaxanthin do lower the risk of cataract formation; and there are studies cited wich conclude so. Now wich one should I accept? 84.0.42.178 (talk) 12:02, 18 July 2012 (UTC)

  • You can check the source that claims insufficient evidence, though I am not sure if it is publicly accessible or not (I can view it from my institution). The source is a meta-analysis, which studies and compares various researches on effects of these antioxidants. It concluded that the antioxidants have little to no effect on lowering age related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the study that does suggest a link with consumption of both lutein and zeaxanthin to lowering of risk of AMD (which is also referenced in this article) came out right after the study above, so it had no chance to be reviewed at that time. I hope this clears the confusion. Syockit (talk) 11:47, 20 May 2014 (UTC)

Zeaxanthin & Colour of Saffron: Contradiction with Saffron Article[edit]

I was confused that this article says that Zeaxanthin gives Saffron its characteristic colour, which is contradicted by the linked Wikipedia article. I know saffron is a complex mix of various carotenoids, but having worked with and seen Crocin in a lab I think it probably is the main contributor to saffron's colour. Just thought I'd let someone know about this. 174.3.162.23 (talk) 04:53, 21 June 2014 (UTC)SirMinkMay

minor problems[edit]

Summary box - "xanthophyll" is not a related compound; it is a class of compounds that includes zeaxanthin (and lutein). (Perhaps Related compounds should just give "xanthophylls".) Isomers... - E. coli should be described as a bacterium (singular rather than plural). Relationship with diseases of the eye - should presumably state: Several observational studies have provided preliminary evidence for an association of high dietary intake of foods containing zeaxanthin... 69.72.92.131 (talk) 23:55, 24 December 2015 (UTC)

zeaxanthin and lutein[edit]

The article states: "Zeaxanthin is one of the most common carotenoid alcohols found in nature. It is the pigment that gives paprika (made from bell peppers), corn, saffron, wolfberries, and many other plants their characteristic color. ... Foods containing the highest amounts of lutein and zeaxanthin are dark green leaf vegetables, such as kale, spinach, turnip greens, collard greens, romaine lettuce, watercress, Swiss chard and mustard greens.[2][16]"

In both references given, it is the amount of (lutein+zeaxanthine) which has been measured and reported. However, in this paper: Br J Ophthalmol. 1998 Aug;82(8):907-10. Fruits and vegetables that are sources for lutein and zeaxanthin: the macular pigment in human eyes. Sommerburg O1, Keunen JE, Bird AC, van Kuijk FJ. the two chemicals were measured separately. These results show that relatively few fruit/vegs have zeaxanthine specifically (exceptions including oranges, maize, honeydew melons, butternut squash [but not pumpkin], and orange capsicum [but not other colours]). In most of the "high (lutein+zeaxanthine)" fruits&vegetables, there was high lutein, but very low zeaxanthine.

So, the statement: "Zeaxanthin is one of the most common carotenoid alcohols found in nature." is probably not correct. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 115.64.142.162 (talk) 02:47, 31 May 2016 (UTC)