Talk:Zweikanalton

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The proper German term is Zweikanalton. If there are no objections, I'll move this over in the next couple of days. See de:Zweikanalton

How it works[edit]

It can carry either a completely separate audio program, or be used for stereo sound transmission. In the latter case, the first FM carrier carries L+R for compatibility, while the second carrier carries 2*R (not L-R.)

Does this mean that it carries 1 left channel & 2 right channels, so that the 2 right channels decode as the stereo audio? --Mahmudmasri (talk) 10:38, 26 July 2009 (UTC)

To answer your question: the 2R just means twice the voltage of signal level (+6dB) so as to match the signal level of the L+R or mono carrier. There are only 2 sound carriers transmitted conventionally in Zweiton. The Left is re-derived by subtracting or phase canceling the Right back away from the Left+Right (channel mixing). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Teknikingman (talkcontribs) 08:13, 20 February 2011 (UTC)