Talking Dreams

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Talking Dreams
Echosmith Talking Dreams Cover Art.png
Studio album by
ReleasedOctober 1, 2013
Genre
Length45:56
LabelWarner Bros.
ProducerMike Elizondo
Echosmith chronology
Summer Sampler (EP)
(2013)
Talking Dreams
(2013)
Acoustic Dreams (EP)
(2014)
Singles from Talking Dreams
  1. "Come Together"
    Released: May 31, 2013
  2. "Talking Dreams"
    Released: July 24, 2013
  3. "Cool Kids"
    Released: September 12, 2014
  4. "Bright"
    Released: February 12, 2015[2][3]
  5. "Let's Love"
    Released: August 14, 2015[4]
Alternate cover
Cover art for 2014 re-release
Cover art for 2014 re-release

Talking Dreams is the debut studio album by American indie pop band Echosmith. The album was released on October 1, 2013 through Warner Bros. Records.[5] All songs on the album were co-written by the four Sierota siblings and their father, Jeffery David.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3.5/5 stars[6]
The Guardian2/5 stars[7]

Matt Collar of AllMusic gave a positive review saying "Echosmith's 2013 debut album, Talking Dreams, introduces a group with an unabashedly youthful take on dance-rock — even though their style pays celebratory tribute to '80s pop music. A band composed of the four Sierota siblings, the California-based Echosmith includes lead singer Sydney, guitarist/vocalist Jamie, bassist/vocalist Noah, and drummer Graham. Working with producer Mike Elizondo and songwriter Jeffery David, the band's freshman effort is impressively filled out with radio-ready songs that combine U2's chiming guitars, Fleetwood Mac's harmonies, and Killers-style neo-new wave production. In that sense, Echosmith will also draw favorable comparisons to such similarly inclined acts as Paramore, Kitten, and Ireland's Two Door Cinema Club. Cuts like the romantic title track, the sparkling "Let's Love", and the bubbly "Come with Me" are all infectious and smartly produced, and tend to stick in your head long after the album ends. There is a brilliant lightness to these songs — nothing ever feels too thought-out. While this doesn't lend a ton of depth to the album, with the members of Echosmith barely in their twenties and lead singer Sydney just sixteen, it only seems logical to assume that there's room for growth. And based on Talking Dreams, that growth will be a pleasure to witness".[6]

By contrast, Daniel Bromfield of the Daily Emerald criticized both the album and the band itself as lacking originality, declaring that they were the point where the phrase "indie" was "another meaningless marketing word like "all natural"". He said, "This is "indie pop" at its most anonymous, a mishmash of the tricks that made their stylistic predecessors click with audiences." While he admitted that "the formula the band works under can be done right and has been by quite a few bands", he remarked that "Echosmith possesses exactly zero qualities that elevate them above the rest of the pack" and that their lyrics were subpar, saying that most of the songs incorporated overused imagery, while some "are just plain awful." He notes that "Cool Kids" would have been the best track of the album were it not for "its cringe-worthy chorus of "I wish that I could be like the cool kids/Because all the cool kids seem to fit in.", saying that the line was "terribly ironic" because "Echosmith has already fit in. But the cool kids are the ones that came before them, and Echosmith merely follow in their wake, trying to look and talk and think exactly like them. They only fit in because it’s what everyone else in their social current does."[8]

Michael Cragg of The Guardian also criticized the album as "catchy but characterless". He notes that the band makes "the kind of polished, laser-guided indie pop that sounds all too familiar", saying that "March Into the Sun", "Bright", and "Come Together" are inspired by other artists, "while the rest congeals into a primary-coloured clump of advert-friendly, frustratingly anonymous background music". "Cool Kids", however, was noted as "the obvious standout". He wrote that the song's "gold-plated chorus is good enough to make you ignore the clunky, straight-to-DVD teen film lyrics".[7]

Track listing[edit]

No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Come Together"
  • Echosmith
  • Jeffery David
4:40
2."Let's Love"
  • Echosmith
  • David
3:03
3."Cool Kids"
  • Echosmith
  • David
  • Jesiah Dzwonek
3:57
4."March into the Sun"
  • Echosmith
  • David
  • Tom Leonard
3:22
5."Come with Me"
  • Echosmith
  • David
4:12
6."Bright"3:42
7."Talking Dreams"
  • Echosmith
  • David
  • Leonard
3:09
8."Tell Her You Love Her"
  • Echosmith
  • David
4:07
9."Ran Off in the Night"
  • Echosmith
  • David
4:24
10."Nothing's Wrong"
  • Echosmith
  • David
3:34
11."Safest Place"
  • Echosmith
  • David
  • Leonard
4:16
12."Surround You"
  • Echosmith
  • David
3:30
Total length:45:56
  • The album was re-released on October 8, 2014 with the radio edit of "Cool Kids" (3:35 min.) replacing the album version.[9]

Personnel[edit]

Echosmith

  • Sydney Sierota – lead vocals
  • Noah Sierota – bass guitar, percussion, vocals
  • Jamie Sierota – lead guitar, keyboards, percussion, programming, vocals
  • Graham Sierota – drums, vocals

Additional musicians

  • Jeffery David – percussion
  • Mike Elizondo – keyboards, percussion, programming, vocals

Charts and certifications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Artists: Rock". Warner Bros. Records. Retrieved December 13, 2014.
  2. ^ "WebCite query result". webcitation.org. Archived from the original on January 27, 2015.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  3. ^ "WebCite query result". webcitation.org. Archived from the original on January 10, 2015. Retrieved 17 January 2015.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  4. ^ "R&R :: Going For Adds :: Hot AC" (Week Of: August 11, 2015). Radio & Records. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  5. ^ "Alter The Press!: Echosmith Announce New Album 'Talking Dreams'". alterthepress.com. Retrieved 17 January 2015.
  6. ^ a b Echosmith – Talking Dreams: Review at AllMusic. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  7. ^ a b Cragg, Michael (11 January 2015). "Echosmith: Talking Dreams review – catchy but characterless".
  8. ^ Bromfield, Daniel (September 30, 2013). "Album review: Echosmith's 'Talking Dreams' lacks originality". DailyEmerald.com. Daily Emerald. Archived from the original on December 2, 2014. Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  9. ^ "iTunes - Music - Talking Dreams by Echosmith". iTunes. Retrieved 17 January 2015.
  10. ^ "Australiancharts.com – Echosmith – Talking Dreams". Hung Medien. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  11. ^ "Austriancharts.at – Echosmith – Talking Dreams" (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  12. ^ "Ultratop.be – Echosmith – Talking Dreams" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  13. ^ "Ultratop.be – Echosmith – Talking Dreams" (in French). Hung Medien. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  14. ^ "Danishcharts.dk – Echosmith – Talking Dreams". Hung Medien. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  15. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Echosmith – Talking Dreams" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  16. ^ "Officialcharts.de – Echosmith – Talking Dreams". GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  17. ^ "Swedishcharts.com – Echosmith – Talking Dreams". Hung Medien. Retrieved February 20, 2015.
  18. ^ "Swisscharts.com – Echosmith – Talking Dreams". Hung Medien. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  19. ^ "Echosmith Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard.
  20. ^ "Echosmith Chart History (Heatseekers Albums)". Billboard.
  21. ^ "Echosmith Chart History (Top Rock Albums)". Billboard.
  22. ^ "American album certifications – Echosmith – Talking Dreams". Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH.