Tamar Yellin

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Tamar Yellin
Born Leeds, England
Language English
Alma mater University of Oxford
Genre Fiction
Notable works The Genizah at the House of Shepher
Notable awards Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature (2007)
Website
www.tamaryellin.com

Tamar Yellin is an author and teacher who lives in Yorkshire. Her first novel, The Genizah at the House of Shepher, won the 2007 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature.

Biography[edit]

Tamar Yellin was raised in Leeds.[1] Her father was a third-generation native of Jerusalem;[2] his father was Yitzhak Yaakov Yellin (1885–1964), one of the pioneers of the Hebrew language press in pre-state Israel. Her mother was the daughter of a Polish immigrant to England.[2]

Yellin attended the Leeds Girls' High School.[3] She studied biblical and modern Hebrew language and Arabic language at the University of Oxford.[1]

She spent 13 years writing her first novel, The Genizah at the House of Shepher (2005),[1][4] and took two years to find a publisher.[5] This was followed by a collection of 13 short stories, Kafka in Brontëland (2006) and another novel, Tales of the Ten Lost Tribes (2008). She also writes fiction for magazines, including The London Magazine and the Jewish Quarterly,[1] and has published stories in two anthologies, The Slow Mirror and Other Stories: New Fiction by Jewish Writers (1996) and Mordecai's First Brush with Love: New Stories by Jewish Women in Britain (2004).[6]

Yellin is a teacher for the Interfaith Education Center, in which capacity she speaks to non-Jewish schoolchildren about Jewish religious practices.[2][4]

Writing style[edit]

Yitzhak Yaakov Yellin's house in Kiryat Moshe, Jerusalem

Yellin incorporates much of her own personal history in her work. The plot for her first novel, The Genizah at the House of Shepher was based on her family's discovery of historic notes on the Aleppo Codex in the attic of their home.[4]

Prizes[edit]

  • 2007 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, for The Genizah at the House of Shepher. The prize money was $100,000.[3]
  • 2007 Reform Judaism Prize for Jewish Fiction, for her short-story collection, Kafka in Bronteland[2]
  • 2006 Harold U. Ribalow Prize, for The Genizah at the House of Shepher[7]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Phillips, Laura; Baraitser, Marion, eds. (2004). Mordecai's First Brush with Love: New Stories by Jewish Women in Britain. Loki. p. 57. ISBN 0952942666. 
  2. ^ a b c d "The Winner Is: Introducing Tamar Yellin". Reform Judaism Online. Union for Reform Judaism. Spring 2007. Retrieved 30 May 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Friedman, Dr. Dan (May 2007). "A World Written: In Conversation with Tamar Yellin". The Forward. Retrieved 30 May 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Wood, M. E. (2015). "Tamar Yellin - Author Interview". Bella Online. Retrieved 30 May 2015. 
  5. ^ "The Genizah at the House of Shepher - Tamar Yellin". Jewish Book Council. Retrieved 30 May 2015. 
  6. ^ Yellin, Tamar (Spring 2005). "The Genizah at the House of Yellin". Jewish Quarterly. Retrieved 30 May 2015. 
  7. ^ McBain, Genever (14 December 2006). "Tamar Yellin, British First-Time Novelist, Receives 2006 Ribalow Award". Hadassah Women's Zionist Organization of America. Retrieved 30 May 2015. 

External links[edit]