Tan Le

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Tan Le
TanTTLe.jpg
Tan Le
Born Lê Thị Thái Tần
(1977-05-20) 20 May 1977 (age 38)
Vietnam
Occupation Technology entrepreneur. Co-Founder of Emotiv
Website http://emotiv.com

Tan Le (Vietnamese: Lê Thị Thái Tần, born 1977), a Vietnamese-Australian telecommunications entrepreneur, is a co-Founder of Emotiv. She was named the 1998 Young Australian of the Year.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in South Vietnam, Le migrated to Australia as a refugee with her family in 1982.[1][2] Le began university studies at the age of 16 and went on to complete a Bachelor's degree in law and commerce in 1998 at Monash University.

Career[edit]

As president of the Vietnamese Community of Footscray Association, she made a number of contributions to charities and newspapers throughout Melbourne.[1]

Le co-founded and ran SASme, a pioneer in providing SMPP platforms to telecommunication carriers and content aggregators, and one of the companies responsible for the creation of Australia's SMS application market[citation needed]. Tan Le helped grow SASme to thirty-five employees and multiple locations worldwide. Tan has also worked with one of Australia's leading law firms, Freehills.

Tan Le was a Special Ambassador to the United Kingdom as a guest of the British High Commission and Foreign Commonwealth Office, a Goodwill Ambassador for Australia in Asia, and a Patron of the Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development Program. Le has been an Ambassador for the Status of Women since 2001, and she has also been appointed to a number of prominent Boards, including Plan International Australia, Australian Citizenship Council, National Committee for Human Rights Education in Australia, and RMIT Business in Entrepreneurship.

Le is a co-founder of software company Emotiv which specialises in electroencephalography (EEG) headsets. Le has spoken of her desire to ensure the company's products are affordable enough for the consumer. She believes that by democratising the technology, there is a greater chance of innovation from individuals, research groups and companies.[3]

Recognition[edit]

In 1998, Le was named Young Australian of the Year[2] and voted one of Australia's 30 Most Successful Women Under 30.[4]

Le's story was featured in the 'Hope' section of the Eternity Exhibition of the National Museum of Australia.[5] Le has been featured in "Who's Who in Australia" List since 1999 and "Who's Who of Australian Women" List in 2007 & 2008, Fast Company's Most Influential Women in Technology in 2010 and Forbes' 50 Names You Need to Know in 2011. Le has been honored by the World Economic Forum as a Young Global Leader since 2009.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Young Australian of the Year 1998: Tan Le, Community Service Volunteer". National Australia Day Council. Archived from the original on 2013-05-11. Retrieved 2013-11-02. 
  2. ^ a b "YOUNG AUSTRALIAN OF THE YEAR: Tan Le, 1998 Award, Community Service". National Australia Day Council. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 2009-12-28. 
  3. ^ "The Technology Entrepreneur that’s Making Science Fiction a Reality". Asian Fortune. Retrieved 2015-06-01. 
  4. ^ "Speaker Bio: Tan Le". Ideas At The Powerhouse. 2001. Retrieved 2009-12-28. [dead link]
  5. ^ Eternity Exhibition, National Museum of Australia

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Nova Peris-Kneebone
Young Australian of the Year
1998
Succeeded by
Bryan Gaensler