Taqali

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Kingdom of Taqali
1750–1969
Capital Not specified
Languages Tegali language
Government Not specified
Makuk (or Makk) of Taqali Muhammed al-Rubatabi
 •  1920 - 199? Adam II of Taqali
History
 •  decline of the Kingdom of Sennar 1750
 •  Taqali conquered by Sudanese Mahdists 1884
 •  British defeat the Mahdists and incorporate Taqali into Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 1889
 •  creation of the Republic of Sudan 1969
The kingdoms of the Funj, Shilluk, Tegali, and Fur c.1800

Taqali (also spelled Tegali) was a state in the Nuba Hills, in modern-day central Sudan. Unlike the surrounding Kordofan, the uplands of the hills were quite moist and suitable to agriculture and a dense population. The state was centred upon the Taqali Massif the highest part of the hills in the northeast of the region. It early history is unclear. Oral traditions state it was founded many centuries ago at the same time as the Kingdom of Sennar came into being. Some scholars doubts these tales and believes that the state did not come into being until the late eighteenth century (between 1750 and 1780), and that the early rulers on the king list are semi-mythological.[1]

It has been argued[1] that the first true ruler of Taqali was Muhammad wad Jayli and that he and his son Ismail forged the state. Some believe[1] it formed during the period of disorder in the Kordofan when the Kingdom of Sennar was declining and Darfur was growing in power. Muhammad began the process of uniting the region. He was succeeded as Makk (also Makuk) by his brother Umar. Umar was overthrown, however, by Ajaid, the queen mother, and Ismail around 1783. Ismail took over and further expanded the state, taking control of the "99 hills" of the region. His son Abakr peacefully succeeded him, but after this the state was beset by conflicts over the succession through much of the period from 1840 to 1880.

Despite its small size the Taqali state remained independent of its more powerful neighbours. While the Nuba Hills were well suited to agriculture they were surrounded by the arid Kordofan. This region was far too dry to support a large army and only small expeditions could be launched. The rocky terrain of the Taqali Massif served as natural fortifications. The Kingdom of Sennar exerted enough pressure that Taqali sent annual tribute, but never conquered the area. When Sennar was destroyed by the Egyptian invasion of 1821 the situation continued. The Egyptians launched three separate attacks against Taqali, but all of them failed. Eventually an agreement was reached whereby Taqali would remain de facto independent but would pay a nominal tribute and be officially included within the Egyptian Sudan.

The state was finally conquered by the forces of the Mahdi Muhammad Ahmad. Makk Adam previcated between the British and the forces of the Mahdi, professing his support for both but aiding neither. In 1883 the Mahdi decided that Taqali had to be conquered. His armies did more than previous ones in July 1884 Makk (also said Makuk) Adam was captured, and he eventually died in captivity. Insurrections continued in Taqali and Hamdan Abu Anja was dispatched to defeat the resistance. This was done though much pillaging and destruction of the region.

With the defeat of the Mahdists the Mukuk of Taqali were restored to power, but they were now closely controlled by the British. Taqali proved a useful ally and the British gradually gave it more territory to control and administer. This continued with the independence of Sudan in 1956. The administrative power of the state was finally done away with after the 1969 coup. The Makk (or Makuk) of Taqali, though having no political power, remains a ceremonial leader to the people of the region to this day.

Mukuk of Taqali[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ewald, Janet J. (1990). Soldier, Traders, and Slaves: State Formation and Economic Transformation in the Greater Nile Valley, 1700-1885. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press. ISBN 0-299-12604-8.