Taqlid

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Taqlid or taqleed (Arabic تَقْليد taqlīd) is an Arabic term in Islamic legal terminology. It literally means "to follow". In Islamic legal terminology it means to follow a mujtahid (as an Islamic scholar who is competent in interpreting sharia) in religious laws and commandment as he has derived them, that is, following the decisions of a religious expert without necessarily examining the scriptural basis or reasoning of that decision,[citation needed] such as accepting and following the verdict of scholars of jurisprudence (fiqh) without demanding an explanation of the processes by which they arrive at it,[citation needed] hence adherence to one of the classical schools (madhhab) of jurisprudence.

Taqlid may be contrasted with independent interpretation of legal sources by intellectual effort (ijtihad).

Overview[edit]

Taqlīd is an Arabic verbal noun based on the verb qallada, literally "to place, to gird or to adorn with a necklace"(qilādah).[1] The term is believed to have originated from the idea of allowing oneself to be led "by the collar". One who performs taqlid is called a muqallid,[2] whereas one who rejects taqlid is called a ghair-muqallid. Sheikh Shaamee Hanafi said it is "to take the statement of someone without knowing the evidence."[3]

There are several verses (ayat) in the Quran that forbid[citation needed] taqlid in matters of religion (5:104-5, 17:36, 21:52-54 43:22-24) though this is interpreted as referring only to fundamentals (usul ad-din) and not to subsidiary elements (furu `ad-din) such as details of law and ritual practices that can only be learned through extensive study.

Following the Greater Occultation (al-ghaybatu 'l-kubra) in 941 CE (329 AH), the Shia are obliged to observe taqlid in their religious affairs by following the teachings of a thinker (mujtahid) or jurist (faqih).[4] As of the 19th century the Shia ulama taught believers to turn to "a source of taqlid" (marja' at-taqlid) "for advice and guidance and as a model to be imitated."[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Najm al-Din al-Tufi, Sharh Mukhtasar al-Rawdah (Beirut: Mu’assasah al-Risålah, 1410H), 3:65.
  2. ^ Surkheel (Abu Aaliyah) Sharif, The Truth About Taqlid (Part I), the Jawziyyah Institute, 2007, p. 2 [1]
  3. ^ Aqood Rasm al-Muftee, p. 23
  4. ^ al-islam.org 1. What is taqlid?
  5. ^ An introduction to Shiʻi Islam: the history and doctrines of Twelver Shiʻism By Moojan Momen, p.143

External links[edit]