Tara Brach

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Tara Brach
Born (1953-05-15) May 15, 1953 (age 68)
Occupation
  • Psychologist
  • author
Known forBuddhist teaching
Websitetarabrach.com

Tara Brach (born May 17, 1953) is an American psychologist, author, and proponent of Buddhist meditation. She is a guiding teacher and founder of the Insight Meditation Community of Washington, D.C. (IMCW).[1] Her colleagues in the Vipassanā, or insight meditation tradition, include Jack Kornfield, Sharon Salzberg, and Joseph Goldstein.[2] Brach also teaches about Buddhist meditation at centers for meditation and yoga in the United States and Europe, including Spirit Rock Meditation Center in Woodacre, California; the Kripalu Center;[3] and the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies.[4]

Brach is an Engaged Buddhist, specializing in the application of Buddhist teachings and mindfulness meditation to emotional healing.[5] She has authored several books on these subjects, including Radical Acceptance, True Refuge, and Radical Compassion.

Education[edit]

Brach holds bachelor's degrees in psychology and political science from Clark University.[6] She was awarded a doctorate in clinical psychology from the Fielding Graduate University[7] based on her dissertation analyzing the effectiveness of meditation in the healing of eating disorders.

Personal life[edit]

Brach resides in Virginia with her husband, Jonathan Foust, a yoga and meditation teacher. She was raised Christian Unitarian.[8][9][10]

Bibliography[edit]

Books and published works[edit]

  • Brach, Tara (2003). Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life with the Heart of a Buddha. Bantam. ISBN 0-553-80167-8.
  • Brach, Tara (2012). "Mindful Presence: A Foundation for Compassion and Wisdom", in Wisdom and Compassion in Psychotherapy: Deepening Mindfulness in Clinical Practice edited by Christopher K. Germer and Ronald D. Siegel. Guilford Press ISBN 978-1462518869
  • Brach, Tara (2013). True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart. Bantam. ISBN 978-0553807622.
  • Brach, Tara (2014). "Healing Traumatic Fear: The Wings of Mindfulness and Love", in Mindfulness-Oriented Interventions for Trauma: Integrating Contemplative Practices edited by Follette, Briere, Rozelle, Hopper and Rome. Guilford Press ISBN 978-1462518586
  • Brach, Tara (2019). Radical Compassion: Learning to Love Yourself and Your World with the Practice of RAIN. Viking. ISBN 978-0525522812.
  • Brach, Tara (2021). Trusting the Gold: Uncovering Your Natural Goodness. Sounds True. ISBN 978-1-68364-713-3.

Audio publications[edit]

  • Radical Self-Acceptance: A Buddhist Guide to Freeing Yourself from Shame (2005) ISBN 978-1591793212
  • Radical Acceptance: Guided Meditations (2007) ISBN 978-0615185583
  • Meditations for Emotional Healing (2009) ISBN 978-1591797418
  • Meditation and Psychotherapy: A Professional Training Course for Integrating Mindfulness into Clinical Practice (2011) ISBN 978-1591799702
  • Mindfulness Meditations: Nine Guided Practices to Awaken Presence and Open Your Heart (2012) ISBN 978-1604077988
  • Finding True Refuge: Meditations for Difficult Times (2013) ISBN 978-1604078633

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tara Brach - Teacher page". imcw.org. Insight Meditation Community of Washington. Retrieved January 31, 2016.
  2. ^ Publishers Weekly Review Publishers Weekly review of Radical Acceptance Retrieved January 31, 2016.
  3. ^ "Tara Brach". Kripalu.org. Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health. Retrieved November 28, 2015.
  4. ^ "Tara Brach, PhD". Eomega.org. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Inc. February 12, 2012. Retrieved November 29, 2015.
  5. ^ www.apa.org https://www.apa.org/monitor/2014/02/buddhism-psychology. Retrieved February 20, 2022. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ Omega Institute Teacher Page Retrieved November 28, 2015
  7. ^ Adelman, Ken (May 1, 2005). "What I've learned: Tara Brach". Washingtonian. Retrieved August 9, 2011.
  8. ^ "Riding the wave of secular meditation". June 2, 2013. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  9. ^ "Meditation guru Tara Brach is calm eye of Washington's storm - OnFaith". Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  10. ^ ""Allow life to be as it is"" (PDF). Retrieved April 5, 2019.

External links[edit]

Interviews[edit]

Articles[edit]