Tararua College

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Tararua College
Address
Churchill Street, Pahiatua,
New Zealand
Coordinates 40°27′22″S 175°50′02″E / 40.4560°S 175.8338°E / -40.4560; 175.8338Coordinates: 40°27′22″S 175°50′02″E / 40.4560°S 175.8338°E / -40.4560; 175.8338
Information
Type State, Co-educational,
Secondary (Year 9-15)
Motto Māori: Tama Tu Tama Ora
"those who strive live fully"
Established 1960
Ministry of Education Institution no. 235
Principal Jon Ward[1]
School roll 331[2] (February 2017)
Socio-economic decile 3I[3]
Website

Tararua College is a secondary school in Pahiatua, New Zealand, with approximately 407 students.

History[edit]

Tararua College opened in 1960. Like most New Zealand state secondary school opened in the 1960s, the school was built to the Nelson common design plan, characterised by two-storey H-shaped classroom blocks, of which the school has one. The regional station Tararua TV was started in 2004, in an egg-carton lined room at the school.[4] In 2006, pupil brawls and abuse of teachers at the school was effectively stopped with the introduction of a ban on student cellphones.[5] Later that year a student teacher was forced to resign after admitting an affair with a pupil of the school.[6]

Notable former pupils[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Senior Management Team". Retrieved 14 February 2017. 
  2. ^ "Directory of Schools - as at 6 March 2017". New Zealand Ministry of Education. Retrieved 10 April 2017. 
  3. ^ "Decile Change 2014 to 2015 for State & State Integrated Schools". Ministry of Education. Retrieved 12 February 2015. 
  4. ^ "Tararua TV station widens its coverage". The Dominion Post. 1 June 2008. Retrieved 17 February 2010. [dead link]
  5. ^ O'Rourke, Simon (11 March 2006). "Teenage bullies hound 12-year-old to death". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
  6. ^ Woulfe, Catherine (14 December 2006). "Teacher admits affair with 16-year-old". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
  7. ^ Smith, Jacqueline (14 April 2009). "High flyer steps up to Diocesan top job". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 

External links[edit]