Target: Terror

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Target: Terror
Target - Terror Coverart.png
Developer(s)Raw Thrills
Leviathan Games (Wii)
Publisher(s)
Konami (Wii)
Designer(s)Eugene Jarvis
Platform(s)Arcade
Wii[1]
ReleaseArcade
  • NA: May 2004
Wii
  • NA: April 22, 2008
Genre(s)Light gun shooter
Mode(s)Up to 2 players simultaneously
CabinetStandard 27in upright, deluxe 33in
Arcade systemPC with NVidia Graphics, custom I/O
DisplayRaster, VGA resolution, horizontal

Target: Terror (known as Target: Force in Japan) is a shooter arcade game developed and published in 2004 by Raw Thrills, and designed by Eugene Jarvis. The game involves shooting terrorists attacking various places in the United States, including Denver Airport, the Golden Gate Bridge and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

There is a special edition called Target: Terror Gold which awards medals to the player as a bonus and, also has hidden minigames that can be unlocked by damaging certain parts of the environment such as windows or oil drums.

Gameplay[edit]

The game challenges players to fight against terrorist attacks on the Golden Gate Bridge, the Los Alamos nuclear power plant, and the Denver International Airport using optical guns. The final mission is to prevent a hijacked airliner from being crashed into the White House. The Gold version contains the same levels as the original version but includes several bonus rooms. One such room has the player shooting turkeys with bombs strapped to them that are flung by terrorists in a field. Another bonus room is similar to Missile Command and has players intercepting ICBMs with flares. Players are awarded combat medals after each successfully completed mission. The game features two modes: 2-player simultaneous play on one gun or Justice Mode. Justice Mode can play both guns on one player.

Plot[edit]

After dispatching and killing all terrorists, helping all officials (and keeps all the officials alive, along with the innocents) and saving all innocents in all these areas, the player(s) is (are) sent to a Boeing 747 that has been hijacked. The player(s) must fight their way to the cockpit in order to stop the terrorists from performing a suicide attack on the White House. If the player(s) succeeds in killing all the terrorists, helping all officials while successfully keeping them all alive, saving all innocents, and stops the White House suicide attack. the president then says that he and the whole world thanks the player for their courage and bravery of stopping the terrorists, calls the player(s) a hero, and also says "It's because of heroes like yourselves, that this country is a safe place for democracy and the American way of life", static is on the screen and then says "To be continued."

Development[edit]

The game was unveiled at the January 2004 Amusement Trades Exhibition International show in London, along with Raw Thrills' racing game The Fast and the Furious and ICE/Play Mechanix's Shooting Game Johnny Nero: Action Hero.

Wii port[edit]

Target: Terror was ported to the Wii by Konami in 2008. It supports the Wii Zapper peripheral.

The Wii version received generally negative reviews from critics, receiving an average score of 37.26% based on 19 reviews on the review aggregator GameRankings,[2] and an average score of 33 out of 100 based on 19 reviews on Metacritic.[3]

One criticism was attributed towards the difficulty of the game, Jeff Gerstmann noted, "Someone, somewhere is able to play the arcade version of this on one quarter. If you encounter him, do not take this gentleman up on his offer to give you a ride home! It will only end in tears, several years of forced servitude, and a shallow grave near mile marker 117."[4]

In 2009, IGN gave the game Worst Visuals award on the Wii.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Target: Terror from AllGame.com
  2. ^ "Target: Terror Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved 2016-06-13.
  3. ^ "Target: Terror (wii: 2008): Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 2016-06-13.
  4. ^ Jeff Gerstmann, Giantbomb.com. "Target: Terror Review". p. 1. Retrieved 2008-05-07.
  5. ^ IGN Staff. "IGN: The Greatest Graphics of All Time". p. 2. Retrieved 2009-03-22.

External links[edit]