Tarlac Cathedral

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Tarlac Cathedral
San Sebastian Cathedral
Catedral de San Sebastián de Tarlac
FvfTarlacCity9338 01.JPG
Tarlac Cathedral is located in Philippines
Tarlac Cathedral
Tarlac Cathedral
Location within the Philippines
15°29′16″N 120°35′17″E / 15.487663°N 120.588134°E / 15.487663; 120.588134Coordinates: 15°29′16″N 120°35′17″E / 15.487663°N 120.588134°E / 15.487663; 120.588134
LocationTarlac
CountryPhilippines
DenominationRoman Catholic
History
StatusCathedral
Founded1686
DedicationSaint Sebastian
Architecture
Functional statusActive
Architectural typeChurch building
StyleNeo-Gothic
CompletedPost-1945
Specifications
MaterialsGravel, Cement, Steel, Concrete
Administration
ArchdioceseSan Fernando
DioceseTarlac
Clergy
ArchbishopFlorentino Lavarias
Bishop(s)Enrique V. Macaraeg

The San Sebastian Cathedral, also referred to as the Tarlac Cathedral, is a post-war, Neo-Gothic church located in Brgy. Mabini, Tarlac City, Philippines. The cathedral, which was dedicated to Saint Sebastian in 1686, is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tarlac.

Parish history[edit]

The town of Tarlac was said to have been established in 1686 by priests assigned to Magalang, Pampanga. The town was managed by the Augustinians from Pampanga until in 1725, a petition was brought to the attention of the Father Provincial to separate Tarlac from its distant matrix. In 1727, the separation was fulfilled with Tarlac being declared an independent parish. In 1757, however, the parish of Tarlac was annexed back to Magalang for quite some time.[1]

Architectural history[edit]

The first parochial building of Tarlac is attributed to Father Agustin Barriocanal in 1740. Later on, in 1872, a wood and stone church was erected by Father Baltasar Gamarra. Construction of the said structure lasted until 1875 by Father Tomas Fito and was completed by Father Fermin Sardon in 1890. The finished church was said to have been identical to the church of Concepcion. The church was completely destroyed during the war, in 1945. It was later rebuilt into the present-day church structure.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Galende, Pedro (1996). Angels in Stone: Architecture of Augustinian Churches in the Philippines (1st ed.). Manila, Philippines: San Agustin Museum. p. 166. ISBN 9719157100.

External links[edit]