Tarrasiiformes

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Tarrasiiformes
Temporal range: Carboniferous
Scientific classification
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Phylum:
Subphylum:
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Order:
Tarrasiiformes
Families

Tarasiiformes is an extinct order of prehistoric ray-finned fish.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

Timeline of genera[edit]

CarboniferousDevonianGzhelianKasimovianMoscovianBashkirianSerpukhovianViséanTournaisianFamennianFrasnianGivetianEifelianEmsianPragianLochkovianPalaeophichthysParatarrasiusTarrasiusCarboniferousDevonianGzhelianKasimovianMoscovianBashkirianSerpukhovianViséanTournaisianFamennianFrasnianGivetianEifelianEmsianPragianLochkovian

Tarrasius is an extinct genus of Tarasiiformes. Tarrasius problematicus (of Mississippian origin, ~ 350 Ma) featured a fully regionalized tetrapod-like spine divided into 5 distinct segments.[6][7] It is not considered a transitional fossil though, but an extreme example of convergent evolution.

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology. 363: 1–560. Retrieved 2011-05-17.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tarrasiiformes". Paleobiology Database. Retrieved November 17, 2012.
  2. ^ Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology. 363: 1–560. Retrieved 2009-02-27.
  3. ^ Haaramo, Mikko (2007). "Chordata – lancets, tunicates, and vertebrates". Mikko's Phylogeny Archive. Retrieved 30 December 2016.
  4. ^ Nelson, Joseph S.; Grande, Terry C.; Wilson, Mark V. H. (2016). Fishes of the World (5th ed.). John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 9781118342336.
  5. ^ van der Laan, Richard (2016). "Family-group names of fossil fishes". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  6. ^ Lauren Cole Sallan (23 May 2012). "Tetrapod-like axial regionalization in an early ray-finned fish" (PDF). Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 279 (1741): 3264–3271. doi:10.1098/rspb.2012.0784. PMC 3385743. PMID 22628471.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Human-Like Spine Morphology Found in Aquatic Eel Fossil". Science Daily. May 22, 2012.

External links[edit]