Tarry's

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Tarrys
Tarrys is located in British Columbia
Tarrys
Tarrys
Location of Tarrys in British Columbia
Coordinates: 49°23′09″N 117°33′18″W / 49.3859°N 117.5551°W / 49.3859; -117.5551Coordinates: 49°23′09″N 117°33′18″W / 49.3859°N 117.5551°W / 49.3859; -117.5551
Country Canada
Province British Columbia
RegionWest Kootenay
Regional DistrictCentral Kootenay
Area codes250, 778, 236, & 672
Highways Hwy 3A

Tarrys is an unincorporated community spanning both shores of the Kootenay River in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia.[1] The location, on BC Highway 3A, is by road about 14 kilometres (9 mi) northeast of Castlegar, and 30 kilometres (19 mi) southwest of Nelson.

Name origin & Tarry family[edit]

In 1896, James & Lydia Tarry, and children, settled on their Riverview Ranch. By 1901, their 800-acre (3.2 km2) orchard comprised 500 fruit trees, half apple and the rest cherry, plum, pear, and peach. James was a justice of the peace (JP) and president of the West Kootenay Farmers' Institute.[2] Possibly on the stepping down of his father, Frank Tarry became a JP in 1914.[3] On his death in 1917, James was the owner of the largest cleared ranch in the Kootenay Valley.[4]

Railway[edit]

In 1906, Tarry Siding, also called Tarrys' Siding, Tarry's, and Tarry, opened on the Columbia and Kootenay Railway.[2] The Canadian Pacific Railway flag stop, which appeared around 1908,[5] was 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi) northeast of Thrums, and 3.7 kilometres (2.3 mi) southwest of Glade.[6] Passenger service ended in the late 1950s.

Train Timetables (Regular stop or Flag stop)
Year 1907 1918 1929 1932 1935 1939 1943 1948 1953 1954 1960
Ref. [7] [8] [9] [10] [6] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16]
Type Nil Unknown Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Flag Nil

Doukhobors[edit]

During 1910–1925, over 30 Doukhobor families settled.[17]
1911: Uninsured Doukhobor sawmill at Tarrys Siding burned to the ground. Rebuilding was immediate to complete the CP tie contract.[18]
1927: Storekeeper was convicted of perjury.[19]
1932: Tarrys Doukhobor Society built a community hall.[17]
1949: Freedomites burned down the new $85,000 Tarrys school.[20][21]
1958: Children found a cache of blasting fuses and detonator caps at the Freedomite settlement.[22]
1962: Over three successive days, the Freedomites dynamited a transformer[23] and two power poles at Tarrys belonging to West Kootenay Power and Light.[24][25]

Glade Ferry[edit]

From the 1910s, the Doukbors operated the original ferry to serve their settlements on the south shore of the river stretching as far south as Tarrys. Being no schedule, users would yell for the reaction ferry if on the opposite bank. When the Brilliant Dam opened in 1944, the service ceased because of the reduced current. Subsequently, crossings depended upon a community-owned rowboat, and later a privately owned barge and tug. In 1955, the province installed a three-vehicle cable ferry, and moved the landing downstream to the population centre. The vehicle capacity increased to five, and then eight in 1980.[26][27]

Glade Ferry Rd. parallels the highway southwest for 1.8 kilometres (1.1 mi) from the Glade junction. Geographically, the ferry is 1.1 kilometres (0.7 mi) northeast of Tarrys Rd. and 0.5 kilometres (0.3 mi) northeast of Tarrys fire hall. The 10-vehicles/48-passenger ferry[28] operates under private contract with the British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and is free of tolls, as are all inland ferries in BC.[29]

Present community[edit]

Tarrys Fire Department, staffed by volunteers, owns a small fleet of fire trucks.[30] Directly opposite is Kalesnikoff Lumber, the largest industry. However, this sawmill regards itself as being in Thrums,[31] indicating the unclear boundary between the communities, or that Thrums is a generic name for the area that stretches north to Glade.[2]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tarrys (community)". BC Geographical Names.
  2. ^ a b c "Castlegar News, 30 Aug 2017". www.castlegarnews.com.
  3. ^ "Daily Colonist, 15 May 1914". www.archive.org. p. 6.
  4. ^ "Daily Colonist, 3 Jun 1917". www.archive.org. p. 19.
  5. ^ "British Columbia railways: Passenger stations and stops" (PDF). www.railwaystationlists.co.uk. p. 13.
  6. ^ a b "1935 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 10 (TT 70).
  7. ^ "1907 timetable" (PDF). www.traingeek.ca. p. 44.
  8. ^ "1918 BC Directory". www.bccd.vpl.ca.
  9. ^ "1929 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 30 (TT115).
  10. ^ "1932 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 471 (TT155).
  11. ^ "1939 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 126 (TT151).
  12. ^ "1943 timetable" (PDF). www.streamlinermemories.info. p. 44 (TT151).
  13. ^ "1948 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 45 (TT151).
  14. ^ "1953 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 44 (TT121).
  15. ^ "1954 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. pp. 44 (TT121).
  16. ^ "1960 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 25 (TT40).
  17. ^ a b "Tarrys". www.doukhobor.org.
  18. ^ "Daily Colonist, 19 Mar 1911". www.archive.org. p. 8.
  19. ^ "Daily Colonist, 27 Oct 1927". www.archive.org. p. 18.
  20. ^ "Daily Colonist, 27 May 1949". www.archive.org. p. 1.
  21. ^ "Daily Colonist, 5 Jun 1949". www.archive.org. p. 16.
  22. ^ "Daily Colonist, 12 Feb 1958". www.archive.org. p. 1.
  23. ^ "Incident 19620201020321001". www.extremism.ca.
  24. ^ "Incident 19620202020321001". www.extremism.ca.
  25. ^ "Incident 19620203020321001". www.extremism.ca.
  26. ^ "Nelson Star, 14 Jul 2011". www.nelsonstar.com.
  27. ^ "Nelson Star, 20 Sep 2014". www.nelsonstar.com.
  28. ^ "Glade Cable Ferry". www.gov.bc.ca.
  29. ^ "Inland Ferries". www.gov.bc.ca.
  30. ^ "Tarrys Vol. Fire Department". www.waymarking.com.
  31. ^ "Kalesnikoff". www.kalesnikoff.com.