Tarsius

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Tarsius[1]
Tarsius sp. 1.jpg
Spectral tarsier
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Suborder: Haplorhini
Family: Tarsiidae
Genus: Tarsius
Storr, 1780
Type species
Lemur tarsier
Erxleben, 1777
Species

Tarsius is a genus of tarsiers, small primates native to islands of Southeast Asia. Until 2010, all tarsier species were typically assigned to this genus, but a revision of the family Tarsiidae restored the generic status of Cephalopachus and created a new genus Carlito for two species.[1] All members of Tarsius are found on Sulawesi or nearby Indonesian islands.

Species[edit]

Colin Groves and Myron Shekelle's 2010 revision of the family Tarsiidae recognized the following eight or nine extant species of Tarsius, being unsure as to whether T. pumilus was valid:

The following two species were described by Shekelle Groves, and colleagues in 2017:[2]

As of 2018, Fossilworks also recognizes the following additional extinct species:[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Groves, C.; Shekelle, M. (2010). "The Genera and Species of Tarsiidae". International Journal of Primatology. 31 (6): 1071–1082. doi:10.1007/s10764-010-9443-1.
  2. ^ Shekelle, Myron; Groves, Colin P.; Maryanto, Ibnu; Mittermeier, Russell A. (2017). "Two New Tarsier Species (Tarsiidae, Primates) and the Biogeography of Sulawesi, Indonesia" (PDF). Primate Conservation. 31: 61–69.
  3. ^ Tarsius Storr 1780 (tarsier) at fossilworks.org (retrieved November 24, 2018)
  4. ^ Beard, K. Christopher; Qi, Tao; Dawson, Mary R.; Wang, Banyue; Li, Chuankuei (1994). "A diverse new primate fauna from middle Eocene fissure-fillings in southeastern China". Nature. 368 (6472): 607. doi:10.1038/368604a0.
  5. ^ Chaimanee, Y.; Lebrun, R.; Yamee, C.; Jaeger, J.-J. (2010). "A new Middle Miocene tarsier from Thailand and the reconstruction of its orbital morphology using a geometric-morphometric method". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 278 (1714): 1956–1963. doi:10.1098/rspb.2010.2062. PMC 3107645. PMID 21123264.

External links[edit]