Tatyana Karimova

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Tatyana Karimova
Tatyana Karimova.jpg
Karimova in February 2010
First Lady of Uzbekistan
In role
1 September 1991 – 2 September 2016
PresidentIslam Karimov
Preceded byPosition created
Succeeded byZiroatkhon Hoshimova
Personal details
Spouse(s)Islam Karimov (1967–2016; his death)
Children

Tatyana Akbarovna Karimova (Russian: Татьяна Акбаровна Каримова) is an Uzbek economist who held the position of First Lady of Uzbekistan from 1991 until 2016. The widow of former President Islam Karimov, she was a highly influential figure throughout her husband's rule. Karimova, together with Rustam Inoyatov, the head of the National Security Service, was expected to play a key role in choosing Karimov's successor.[1]

Early life and family[edit]

Karimova, who is of Russian and Tajik origin, is from the Fergana Region.[2] Her family has been described as influential.[3] She has a sister, Tamara Sobirova. She worked as a researcher at the Institute of Economics of the Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan.

Biography[edit]

Islam Karimov was previously married to his first wife, Natalya Petrovna Kuchmi, from 1964 until their divorce during the mid-1960s.[3] In 1967, he married Tatyana Akbarovna.[3] Tatyana Karimova was working as a researcher at the Institute of Economics at the Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan at the time of her wedding to Karimov.[3] They had two daughters, Gulnara Karimova (born 1972) and Lola Karimova-Tillyaeva (born 1978).

Tatyana Karimova accompanied with her daughter Lola and PM Mirziyoyev met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Samarkand on 6 September 2016

In 2013, a feud between Tatyana Karimova and her eldest daughter, Gulnara Karimova, spilled onto Twitter.[4] Gulnara Karimova accused her mother of trying to "destroy" for attempting to prevent the arrest of her cousin, Akbarali Abdullayev.[4] She also accused her younger sister, Lola Karimova-Tillyaeva, of sorcery.[4] Gulnara Karimova's Twitter account was suspended shortly after the accusations and she is believed to have been placed under house arrest in 2014.[4][5]

Karimova served as the first, and only, First Lady of Uzbekistan from the country's independence until Islam Karimov's death in 2016.[1][6] She was known to engage in charity work and official state functions.[7] However, she was a highly influential advisor on many of her husband's policies.

Tatyana Karimova was expected to be a key figure in choosing her husband's successor in 2016 without being expected to seek the presidency herself.[1] She was seen as an ally of Rustam Inoyatov, the head of the National Security Service, who was also seen as likely help choose Uzbekistan's next president.[1] Prime Minister Shavkat Mirziyoyev was subsequently elected president in elections held in December 2016.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d MacFarquhar, Neil (29 August 2016). "With Uzbekistan's Ruler Gravely Ill, Questions Arise on Succession". New York Times. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  2. ^ "Первая леди Узбекистана Татьяна Каримова". Svobodnaya Pressa. 30 August 2014. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Pannier, Bruce (24 March 2015). "Orphaned Dictator: The Making Of Uzbekistan's Islam Karimov". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d Lillis, Joanna (21 November 2013). "Uzbekistan's ruling family feud spills into open with Twitter row". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  5. ^ Walker, Shaun (16 July 2014). "Uzbekistan's feuding first family and the mystery of the president's missing daughter". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  6. ^ "Obituary: Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov". BBC News. 2 September 2016. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  7. ^ Kondratyev, Andrey (7 June 2013). "Putins' divorce throws spotlight on 'first lady' role". BBC News. Retrieved 3 September 2016.

See also[edit]