Tax rates in Europe

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This is a list of the maximum potential tax rates around Europe for certain income brackets. It is focused on three types of taxes: corporate and individual taxes and value added taxes (VAT). It is not intended to represent the true tax burden to either the corporation or the individual in the listed country.

Summary list[edit]

The quoted income tax rate is, except where noted, the top rate of tax: most jurisdictions have lower rate of taxes for low levels of income. Some countries also have lower rates of corporation tax for smaller companies. In 1980, the top rates of most European countries were above 60%. Today most European countries have rates below 50%.[1]

Country Corporate tax Maximum income tax rate Standard VAT rate
Albania[2] 15% 10% 20%
Austria 25% 55%[3] 20%[4]
Belarus 18% 15% 20%[2]
Belgium[5] 33.99% 50% (excluding 13.07% social security paid by the employee and also excluding 32% social security paid by the employer) 21% (reduced rates of 6% and 12%)[4]
Bosnia and Herzegovina[6] 10% 0% (+ 0–15% per location) 17%
Bulgaria[7] 10% 10% 20%[4]
Croatia 20% 40% (excluding 35.2% total sum of insurances levied on income) 25% (reduced rate of 13%)[8]
Cyprus 12.5% 35% 19% (reduced rates of 8% and 5%)[9]
Czech Republic 19% 22% 21% (reduced rates of 15% and 10%)[4]
Denmark 22% 55.56% (including 8% social security paid by the employee but excluding 0.42–1.48% church tax imposed on members of the national Church of Denmark) 25% (reduced rate 0% on transportation of passengers and newspapers normally published at a rate of more than one issue per month)[4]
Estonia 0% on undistributed profits (25% (20/80%) on distribution of net profit[10]) 20% (+ 2.4% of unemployment insurance tax, 0.8% paid by employer, 1.6% paid by employee and 33% social security which is paid before gross wage by employer) around 57,8 in total 20% (reduced rate 9%)[4]
Finland 20% 56.05% to 62.05% depending on municipality, including 7.8%[11] social insurance fees and excluding employer contribution, which is on average 20.88%.[11] 24%[4][12] (reduced rate of 14% for groceries and restaurants, 10% for books, medicine, transport of passengers and some others)
France 33.3% (36.6% above 3.5M€, 15% below 38k€)[13] 49% (45% +4% for incomes above a yearly EUR 500,000) [14] 20% (reduced rate of 10%, 5.5%, 2.1% and 0% for specific cases like some food, transportation, cultural goods, etc.)[4][15]
Germany 30.175% to 33.325% (15.825% federal plus 14.35% to 17.5% local) additionally 18% pension and 15.5% Healthcare 45% (13.5% ca. entry level tax for income exceeding 8,004 EUR per year, and gradually rising in microscopic steps up to 45%; all income below the threshold of 8,004 EUR per year is not taxed - 0% tax rate). 19% (reduced rate of 7% applies e.g. on sales of certain foods, books and magazines, flowers and transports)[4]
Greece 29% 53% (45% + 8% Solidarity Tax) 24%[4] (13% for groceries)
Hungary 10% up to HUF 500 million and 19% thereafter[16] (flat 9% from 2017) 15% (additional contributions at 10% Social Security by employee and 24% Social Security by employer and health care 7% by employer) 27%[4][17][18]
Iceland 20%[19] 46.24%[19] 24% (12% reduced rate)[19]
Ireland 12.5% on trading income and 25% for non-trading income 52% (PAYE income 40%; additional contributions at 4% Pay-Related Social Insurance (PRSI) and 8% Universal Social Charge (USC)).

A surcharge of 3% applies to people who have income from self-employment above €100,000, regardless of age.

23%[20]
Italy 31.4% (27.5% plus 3.9% municipal) 45% 22%[4]
Latvia 15% 23% 21% (reduced rates 12% and 0%)[21]
Liechtenstein 12.5% (2.5% on IP and royalties) 17.89% (11.6% Social security is shared between employer and employee) 100,000 USD income gives 7.6% income tax rate. 0% capital gains tax. 8%[22]
Lithuania 15% (5% for small businesses with up to 10 employees and up to €300,000 income) 55% (including 15% income tax, 34% social insurance, 6% health insurance)[23] 21%
Luxembourg 29.22% (commercial activity); 5.718% on intellectual property income, royalties; 0% on dividends and capital gains (under certain conditions in case of major participation) 40%[24] 17%[4]
Republic of Macedonia[25] 10% 37% [26] (includes income tax 10%, mandatory state pension 18%, mandatory public health insurance 7.3%, mandatory unemployment insurance 1.2%, mandatory personal injury insurance 0.5%) 18%
Malta 35% (6/7 tax refunds gives an effective rate of 5% for some companies[27]) 35% 18%[4]
Montenegro 9%[28] 9%[28] 17%[28]
Netherlands 20% up to €200,000 of profit and 25% above[29] 52%[30] 21%[31] (reduced rate of 6% and 0% for some goods and services)
Norway[32][33] 25% (proposed 22% by 2018 [34]) 46.9% (53.5% including 14.1% social security contribution by employer. All taxes include 8.2% pension fund payments). 25% (reduced rate of 15% for groceries, and 10% for transport and culture.)
Poland 19% 32% 23%[4]
Portugal 21% 46.5% (additional contributions at 11% Social Security by employee and 23.75% Social Security by employer) 23% (reduced rates 13% and 6%)
Romania 16% 45% (includes social security taxes by the employee and the employer)[35] 20% (5% for food; 9% for medicines, books, newspapers, hotel, or 4%)[4][36]
Serbia 15% 10–52% (capital gains tax 15%, standard income tax rate 10%, additional contributions by employee: 13% state pension fund, 6.5% state health fund, 0.5% unemployment fund; additional contributions by employer: 11% state pension fund, 6.5% state health fund, 0.5% unemployment; maximum contributions capped (amount changing monthly); additional tax for higher salaries (after 3 times average salary additional 10%, after 6 times average salary additional 15%)),[37][38][39] 20%
Slovakia 22% [40] 19% (additional contributions at 4% health care by employee and 10% health care by employer, 9.4% Social Security by employee and 19.4% Social Security by employer) 20%[4] (10% reduced rate)
Slovenia[41] 17% 50% 22%[4] (reduced rate 9.5%) – from 1 July 2013
Spain 28% (25% for SMEs, 4% ZEC companies in Canary Islands) 42% 21%[4] (reduced rates 10% and 4%)
Sweden 22% 56.6% (67% including social security paid by employer[42]) 25%[4] (reduced rates 12% and 6%)
Switzerland 16.55% 30% 8% / 2.5%[43]
Ukraine 18% 17% 20%
United Kingdom 20% (19% from 2017 and 17% from 2020 proposed)[44] 47% total made up of 45% tax on marginal additional annual income above £150,000, 40% between £42,000 and £150,000, 20% between £11,000 and £42,000, 0% below; plus national insurance contributions at various rates between 2% and 13.8%[45] 20% (reduced rate of 5% for home energy and renovations, 0% for life necessities – groceries, water, prescription medications, medical equipment and supplies, public transport, children's clothing, books and periodicals)[4]

Per country information[edit]

Portugal[edit]

Income tax in Portugal depends on the number of people in the household. The taxable income is calculated based on the number of household and marital status.

Main article: Taxation in Portugal
Taxable income Tax on this income
Up to €7,000 14.5%
€7,001 and €20,000 28.5%
€20,001 and €40,000 37%
€40,001 and €80,000 45%
Over €80,000 48%

Germany[edit]

German income tax comprises 5 income tax bands, with the first two being based on a totally Progressive tax rate and the rest being flat rate. Taxable income is derived after subtracting personal and child allowances from earned income. In addition a number of other deductions may be claimed by German taxpayers.

  • Personal allowance: €8,355 per adult
  • Child allowance: €7,008 per child
Annual income above Annual income below Marginal tax rate 2014[46]
€0 €8,354 0%
€8,355 €13,469 14% − 23.97%
€13,470 €52,881 23.97% − 42%
€52,882 €250,730 42%
€250,731 - 45%

Netherlands[edit]

Income tax in the Netherlands (Loonheffing) and social security contributions are combined in one payroll tax. There are no personal tax-free allowances

Annual income Above Annual income below Tax rate (including employee social security)[47] Tax rate (excluding employee social security)
€0 €19,882 33% 1.85%
€19,822 €33,589 41% 10.45%
€33,589 €57,585 42% 42%
€57,585 €- 52% 52%

France[edit]

Income tax in France depends on the number of people in the household. The taxable income is divided by the number of persons belonging to the household. Each adult counts as one person while the first two children count as half each. From the third child onwards each child counts as one person. Therefore, a household comprising 2 adults and 3 children is considered to be a household of 4 persons for tax purposes

Annual income Above Annual income below Tax rate[48]
€0 €5,963 0%
€5,963 €11,896 5.5.%
€11,896 €26,420 14%
€26,420 €70,830 30%
€70,830 - 41%

Spain[edit]

Spanish income tax includes a personal tax free allowance and an allowance per child. In 2012 a special temporary surcharge was introduced as part of austerity measures to balance the budget. The personal allowance currently stands at €5,151.

  • 1st child €1,836
  • 2nd child €2,040
  • 3rd child €3,672
  • 4th & subs €4,182
Annual income above Annual income below Tax rate (excluding temporary surcharge) Tax rate (including temporary surcharge)[49]
€0 €5,150 0% 0%
€5,150 €17,707.20 24% 24.75%
€17,707.20 €33,007.20 28% 30%
€33,007.20 €53,407.20 37% 40%
€53,407.20 €120,000.20 43% 47%
€120,000.20 €175,000.20 44% 49%
€175,000.20 €300,000.20 45% 51%
€300,000.20 - 45% 52%

Italy[edit]

Main article: Taxation in Italy
  • Personal Allowance: €800 per adult[citation needed]
  • Allowance per child: €1,120
Annual income Above Annual income below Tax rate[50]
€0 €15,000 23%
€15,000 €28,000 27%
€28,000 €55,000 38%
€55,000 €75,000 41%
€75,000 - 43%

United Kingdom[edit]

Income tax for the United Kingdom is based on 2016/17 tax bands. The current tax free threshold on earnings is £11,000.[51] The relief is tapered by £1 for every £2 earned over £100,000.

Annual income above Annual income below Tax rate[52]
£0 £11,000 0%
£11,000 £43,000 20%
£43,000 £150,000 40%
£150,000 - 45%

Denmark[edit]

Main article: Taxation in Denmark

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top Marginal Personal Income Tax Rates" (PDF). Tax Policy Center. 2008. Retrieved 2011-12-26. 
  2. ^ a b Federation of International Trade Associations : country profiles
  3. ^ New maximum tax rate from 2016-2020,"Einkommenssteuergesetz 1988 § 33","https://www.ris.bka.gv.at/Dokument.wxe?Abfrage=Bundesnormen&Dokumentnummer=NOR40174043, consulted 11 July 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u All current EU standard rates updated Nov 2014, EU VAT rates as at November 2014, http://www.vatlive.com/vat-rates/european-vat-rates/eu-vat-rates/, consulted 5 January 2015.
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ Fabel Werner Schnittke – International Consulting and Auditing Company
  7. ^ Bulgaria cuts corporate tax to 10 percent – Tax – Business – International Herald Tribune
  8. ^ "Croatia – Tax changes effective March 2012". kpmg.com. 2012-02-24. 
  9. ^ "Cyprus Government VAT Information". Cyprus Government. 2013-01-14. Retrieved 2013-04-06. 
  10. ^ Andmevara, AS. "Income Tax Act – Riigi Teataja". www.riigiteataja.ee. Retrieved 2016-11-26. 
  11. ^ a b http://www.stm.fi/en/insurance/social_insurance_contribution (English)
  12. ^ [2]
  13. ^ "French corporate taxes (in French)". French government. 2014. Retrieved 2014-03-20. 
  14. ^ "Individual income tax rates table". KPMG. 2013. Retrieved 2013-07-10. 
  15. ^ "French VAT since 2014 (in French)". French government. 2014. Retrieved 2014-03-20. 
  16. ^ [3]
  17. ^ "VAT hike pushes Hungary's consumer price inflation to 5.1% in July". Realdeal.hu. 2009-08-11. Retrieved 2011-05-12. 
  18. ^ "Hungary plans bigger budget cuts, VAT hike to 27 pct". 2012-01-01. Retrieved 2012-01-03. 
  19. ^ a b c http://www.invest.is/doing-business/taxation/principal-taxes/
  20. ^ "VAT increase to 23% confirmed". Irish Times. 2011-12-06. Retrieved 2011-12-07. 
  21. ^ "41.pants. Piemērojamās nodokļa likmes" (in Latvian). likumi.lv. 14 December 2012. Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  22. ^ Liechtenstein tax law
  23. ^ http://www.tax.lt/
  24. ^ http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-DU-13-001/EN/KS-DU-13-001-EN.PDF
  25. ^ Invest in Macedonia | Taxes and Rates
  26. ^ "Macedonia's income taxes (in Macedonia)". Public Revenue Office, Macedonia. 2013. Retrieved 2014-09-15. 
  27. ^ http://www.rsmmalta.com.mt/taxation-of-companies.aspx
  28. ^ a b c [4]
  29. ^ Dutch Tax Administration
  30. ^ Dutch Tax Administration
  31. ^ "Netherlands 21% VAT rate increase is effective October 2012". 
  32. ^ The Norwegian tax reform 2004-2006 – regjeringen.no
  33. ^ Skatteetaten – Guide to Value Added Tax in Norway
  34. ^ "Fiscal Budget for 2016 and Tax Reform 2018 - Corporate Blog". Corporate Blog. Retrieved 2016-02-13. 
  35. ^ "Buget 2016 | Open Budget". openbudget.ro. Retrieved 2016-04-20. 
  36. ^ "Romania plans big VAT rise to secure bail-out funds". BBC News. 2010-06-26. Retrieved 2011-05-12. 
  37. ^ Personal Income Tax Law Serbia (official website)
  38. ^ Accurate Personal Income Tax Calculator as of September 2013 for Serbia
  39. ^ Maximum Contributions for State Funds by Accountant Association of Serbia
  40. ^ KPMG tax tables
  41. ^ Ministry of Finance – Tax Administration of the Republic of Slovenia
  42. ^ http://www.ekonomifakta.se/sv/Fakta/Skatter/Skatt-pa-arbete/Marginalskatt/
  43. ^ "Swiss voters approve VAT rate increase". Meridianglobalservices.com. Retrieved 2011-05-12. 
  44. ^ HM Revenue & Customs: Corporation Tax rates
  45. ^ HM Revenue & Customers: Rates and allowances – Income Tax
  46. ^ {de} http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/estg/__32a.html
  47. ^ {nl} http://www.xperthr.nl/artikel/995/tabel-1-schijventarief-loonbelasting-en-premies-volksverzekeringen-%282011%29.aspx
  48. ^ http://www.impots.gouv.fr/portal/deploiement/p1/fichedescriptive_1006/fichedescriptive_1006.pdf
  49. ^ {es} http://www.abc.es/20111231/economia/abci-tabla-recortes-201112310831.html
  50. ^ Redazione internet Agenzia Entrate. "Agenzia delle Entrate - Income tax for individuals". .agenziaentrate.gov.it. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  51. ^ "Tax and tax credit rates and thresholds for 2016-17 - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 2016-06-15. 
  52. ^ "HM Revenue & Customs: Income Tax allowances". Hmrc.gov.uk. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]