Tay (treasurer)

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Tay was a high official of Ancient Egypt with the main title treasurer. He was in office under Hatshepsut (about 1508–1458 BC) and in the first years of Thutmose III (about 1479 BC to 1425 BC). Tay is only known from three attestations. He appears in an rock inscription on the island of Sehel, in a letter (P.Louvre 3230(b)) that is dated by context under Hatshepsut and from a stela found on Sinai. The latter inscription is dated to year 25 under king Thutmose III. Tay is shown here standing behind the king.[1] According to the rock inscription on Sehel he was on a military campaign with the queen to Nubia. The inscription also provides the throne name Maatkare, of queen Hatshepsut[2] The exact date of the military enterprise is not known for sure, but may have happened in year 12 of the queen.[3] Tay was therefore in office from about year 12 of Hatshcpsut till about year 25 under Thutmose III. Under Hatshepsut there is also attested the treasurer Nehsi. Recently it has been suggested, that the office of the royal treasurer was divided into a northern and into a southern office. According to that, Nehesi was the northern treasurer under Hatshepsut, Tay the southern treasurer.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ JJ Shirley: The Power of the Elite: The Officials of Hatshepsut's Regency and Coregency, in: J. Galán, B. M. Bryan, P. F. Dorman (eds.): Creativity and Innovation in the Reign of Hatshepsut, Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization 69, Chicago 2014, ISBN 978-1-61491-024-4, 224
  2. ^ L. Habachi: Two Graffiti at Sehel from the Reign of Queen Hatshepsut, In: JNES 16 (1957), pp. 88–104
  3. ^ JJ Shirley: The Power of the Elite: The Officials of Hatshepsut's Regency and Coregency, in: J. Galán, B. M. Bryan, P. F. Dorman (eds.): Creativity and Innovation in the Reign of Hatshepsut, Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization 69, Chicago 2014, ISBN 978-1-61491-024-4, 225
  4. ^ JJ Shirley: The Power of the Elite: The Officials of Hatshepsut's Regency and Coregency, in: J. Galán, B. M. Bryan, P. F. Dorman (eds.): Creativity and Innovation in the Reign of Hatshepsut, Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization 69, Chicago 2014, ISBN 978-1-61491-024-4, 225

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