Team Ninja

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Team Ninja
Native name
チームニンジャ
Company typeDivision
IndustryVideo games
Founded1995; 29 years ago (1995)
FounderTomonobu Itagaki
Headquarters,
Japan
Key people
Fumihiko Yasuda (president)
ProductsDead or Alive series
Ninja Gaiden series
Nioh series
ParentTecmo (1995–2010)
Koei Tecmo (2010–present)

Team Ninja (Japanese: チームニンジャ) is a Japanese video game developer, and a division of Koei Tecmo, founded in 1995 as a part of Tecmo. It was founded by Tomonobu Itagaki, and is best known for franchises such as Ninja Gaiden, Dead or Alive and Nioh.

History[edit]

Founding, Dead or Alive and Ninja Gaiden (1995–2009)[edit]

Team Ninja was formed by Tomonobu Itagaki from a group of game designers working at Tecmo specifically for the purpose of creating the home versions of the fighting game series Dead or Alive.[1] During the mid-1990s, Japanese gaming company Tecmo was in financial trouble. Seeing how popular Sega's Virtua Fighter series was in Japan at the time, the management asked Tomonobu Itagaki to create a game similar to Virtua Fighter.[2] In order to stand out from other fighting games, Team Ninja focused on making Dead or Alive provocative. Itagaki believed that violence and eroticism were needed for "true entertainment".[3]

In 1999, Team Ninja started work on a new Ninja Gaiden project, originally intended for arcades, later for the Dreamcast. Due to Sega exiting the console business, development was moved to the PlayStation 2.[4][5]

Dead or Alive Ultimate being shown at TGS 2004 at the Xbox booth

However, due to Itagaki being impressed by the technological capabilities of the new Xbox from Microsoft, development was moved to that platform. Ninja Gaiden would be released in 2004 to rave critical acclaim.[6][7][8]

In 2008, the action-adventure game Ninja Gaiden II for the Xbox 360 was published by Microsoft Game Studios, making it the first game created by Team Ninja to not be published by Tecmo; Tecmo Koei later released an enhanced version of Ninja Gaiden II on the PlayStation 3 as Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2.

Merger with Koei (2009–2013)[edit]

In 2009, it was announced that Tecmo and Koei would be merging.[9] The newly founded Koei Tecmo would officially disband Tecmo in 2010.[10][11] A year later all of Tecmo's assets were absorbed into Koei Tecmo, including IP and its subsidiaries and divisions. Team Ninja would continue as subsidiary of Koei Tecmo.[12]

Team Ninja collaborated on multiple titles with Nintendo. In 2010, Team Ninja co-developed a new Metroid action-adventure game for Nintendo's Wii console, titled Metroid: Other M. A playable Stage from Other M would appear in the Nintendo 3DS game Dead or Alive: Dimensions, which was published by Nintendo in Europe and Australia. Team Ninja would in 2014 also collaborate with Omega Force on the development of Hyrule Warriors, an action game set in The Legend of Zelda universe, and with SEGA AM2 since 2012's Dead or Alive 5, co-developing an Arcade version of the title, as well as on bringing characters from Virtua Fighter to Dead or Alive.

Restructuring and Nioh (2013–present)[edit]

In 2013, following a reconstructing of Koei Tecmo, Team Ninja would cease to exist internally, being renamed Koei Tecmo Ichigaya, with Yosuke Hayashi subsequently becoming Head of the Ichigaya Development Group.[13] The developer was also split into two distinct development teams, one led by Ninja Gaiden Sigma director Yosuke Hayashi and one led by Fatal Frame producer Keisuke Kikuchi.[14] Further restructuring at Koei Tecmo in 2016 resulted in Team Tachyon, the developers behind Quantum Theory as well as Rygar: The Battle of Argus being shut down. A large amount of developers were moved to Team Ninja.[15]

Team Ninja's booth at TGS 2017

In 2017, Team Ninja released their new action role-playing game Nioh to great critical response.[16][17] Nioh originally started development in 2004 at Koei, and was moved between multiple developers, such as Omega Force, before Koei approached Team Ninja after the merger in 2010 to help develop the game.[18] When first presented with the project by Koei, Team Ninja staff were skeptic about the game's concept, citing the western protagonist in Sengoku-era Japan, as well as various mechanics.[18] Despite these uncertainties, development was fully transferred to Team Ninja in 2012.[19][18][20] The title would go on to receive multiple awards,[21][22][23][24] and became Team Ninja's best-selling title.[25] They released Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order for the Nintendo Switch in 2019 as well as Dead or Alive 6. Team Ninja released the prequel to Nioh, Nioh 2, in March 2020. A compilation of Ninja Gaiden series, dubbed Ninja Gaiden: Master Collection, released in June 2021. Team Ninja also developed Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin, which released in 2022.[26]

As of 2022, Yosuke Hayashi had left Team Ninja to serve as the general manager of Koei Tecmo's entertainment division,[27] with Fumihiko Yasuda replacing him as president.[28] Wo Long: Fallen Dynasty was announced the same year, being produced by Team Ninja lead Fumihiko Yasuda, who led the development on Nioh and Nioh 2, as well as Masaaki Yamagiwa. Yamagiwa, who joined Team Ninja in 2021 after the closure of Sony's Japan Studio, was previously producer on Bloodborne.[29][30] It released in 2023.

Split with Tomonobu Itagaki[edit]

Tomunobu Itagaki at Tokyo Game Show 2004

Tomonobu Itagaki was promoted to Tecmo Executive Officer in June 2004, as well as to General Manager in 2006, alongside his position as the head of Team Ninja. In 2007 due to a lawsuit regarding alleged sexual harassment, his manager roles would be revoked. Although he was later judged innocent by a Tokyo district court, the lawsuit permanently strained the relationship between Itagaki and Tecmo.[31] On June 3, 2008, Itagaki announced that he would be leaving Tecmo and Team Ninja on July 1, 2008, citing difficulties with the company. In the same statement announcing his resignation, he also announced that he was filing a lawsuit against Tecmo president, Yoshimi Yasuda, over unpaid bonuses for his work on Dead or Alive 4 for the Xbox 360. It was later reported that he was fired from Tecmo on June 18, 2008, in retaliation for his lawsuit.[32] Another lawsuit followed shortly after which was filed on 16 June by two plaintiffs on behalf of Tecmo's 300 employees for unpaid wages amounting to ¥8.3 million.[33] Many of his colleagues at Team Ninja quit as well to join him at his new game development team, Valhalla Game Studios. Some ex-Team Ninja members also helped with Ubisoft's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Smash-Up.[34] The two parties would settle in February 2010 for an undisclosed amount.[35] After Itagaki's departure, Yosuke Hayashi would subsequently serve as the new lead at Team Ninja until his departure in 2022. Fumihiko Yasuda serves as the new president since.[27][28]

Controversies[edit]

Yuka Kuramochi, one of the idols present at Team Ninja's EVO 2019 stream

Depiction of Women[edit]

Team Ninja's provocative style, originally coined by Itagaki,[3] while often having been praised, with Dead or Alive's Kasumi being regarded as a modern-day sex symbol,[36][37] with MTV UK labeling her as one of the sexiest characters in video games,[38] has been criticised for objectifying women.[39][40] In a 2012 Interview with Kotaku, Yosuke Hayashi said that Team Ninja was "very misinterpreted" outside of Japan, and that there's no derogatory intention in their creation process. "We can't help if other cultures in other countries around the globe think that it's a bad representation", so Hayashi.[41] In 2016, Team Ninja garnered public attention after their decision to not release Dead or Alive Xtreme 3 in North America or Europe, reigniting a controversy within the video game industry about the sexualised portrayal of female characters within their games.[40][42][43] Shuhei Yoshida, president of Sony Interactive Entertainment at the time, said in a statement; "It's due to cultural differences. The West has its own thinking about how to depict women in games media which is different from Japan."[44]

Excessive Violence in Ninja Gaiden II[edit]

In 2008, the German Rating Board USK refused classification for Ninja Gaiden II, banning the game for sale in Germany, due to the title's excessive violence. The game's publisher, Microsoft, had no interest in releasing a compromised, cut version of the game.[45] This would later affect the development of the PlayStation 3 version, dubbed Sigma 2, as the game's violence was significantly toned down.[46] Sigma 2 received classification in Germany.[47]

Dead or Alive: Dimensions ban in Sweden and Australia[edit]

In 2011, Dead or Alive: Dimensions was banned in Sweden, due to the rating board determining that the characters appeared too young.[48] Due to Sweden's ban on the title, Australian politician Brendan O'Connor urged the Australian Classification Board to reexamine the title, resulting in the game getting its classification revoked and being removed from sale. Nintendo, the publisher of the game in Europe, Australia and New Zealand, stated that Dead or Alive Dimensions contained no objectionable content and resubmitted the game. The classification was reinstated shortly thereafter.[49][50]

EVO Japan 2019 shutdown[edit]

In 2019, Team Ninja gained controversy, due to a livestream of Dead or Alive 6 at Evo Japan 2019 featuring gravure idols. The livestream was forcibly shut-down by the Evolution Championship Series. The co-founder and CEO of EVO, Joey Cuellar, issued an apology saying that "the stream does not reflect the core values of EVO" and that they had to end to stream to "protect the integrity" of EVO. Mark Julio, head of global business at EVO, later appeared live during the tournament to issue an apology, saying that the content showcased by a partner of EVO wouldn't "reflect the content and intention" of the Esports organiser.[51][52][53][54] Evo 2020 would be cancelled and Cuellar removed as CEO, due to a history of sexual abuse towards minors coming to light.[55]

Rise of the Rōnin not releasing in South Korea[edit]

According to reports, Rise of the Rōnin would not release in South Korea, due to Fumihiko Yasuda comparing Shoin Yoshida, a controversial figure in South Korea, to Socrates. However, Sony has denied those claims.[56]

Games[edit]

Title Release year Genre Platform(s) Notes
Dead or Alive 1996 Fighting game Arcade, Saturn, PlayStation
Dead or Alive 2 1999 Fighting game Arcade, Dreamcast, PlayStation 2 Credited as "Team Ninja - Tecmo Creative #3"
Dead or Alive 3 2001 Fighting game Xbox
Dead or Alive Xtreme Beach Volleyball 2003 Sports, Party Xbox
Ninja Gaiden 2004 Action-adventure, hack and slash Xbox
Dead or Alive Ultimate Fighting game Xbox Remake of Dead or Alive and Dead or Alive 2.
Ninja Gaiden Black 2005 Action-adventure, hack and slash Xbox Enhanced version of Ninja Gaiden.
Dead or Alive 4 Fighting game Xbox 360
Dead or Alive Xtreme 2 2006 Sports, party Xbox 360
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2007 Action-adventure, hack and slash PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita Altered version of Ninja Gaiden. Published by Eidos Interactive in PAL regions.
Ninja Gaiden: Dragon Sword 2008 Action-adventure, hack and slash Nintendo DS
Ninja Gaiden II Action-adventure, hack and slash Xbox 360 Published by Microsoft Game Studios.
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 2009 Action-adventure, hack and slash PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita Altered version of Ninja Gaiden II.
Metroid: Other M 2010 Action-adventure Wii Co-developed with Nintendo SPD, published by Nintendo.
Dead or Alive: Dimensions 2011 Fighting game Nintendo 3DS Published by Nintendo in PAL regions.
Ninja Gaiden 3 2012 Action-adventure, hack and slash PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge Action-adventure, hack and slash PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U Altered version of Ninja Gaiden 3. Wii U version published by Nintendo.
Dead or Alive 5 Fighting game PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Dead or Alive 5 Plus 2013 Fighting game PlayStation Vita Handheld version of Dead or Alive 5
Dead or Alive 5 Ultimate Fighting game PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 Enhanced version of Dead or Alive 5, featuring additional characters and stages.
Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z 2014 Action-adventure, hack and slash PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Microsoft Windows Co-developed with Spark Unlimited and Comcept.
Hyrule Warriors Action, hack and slash Wii U, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch Co-developed with Omega Force
Dead or Alive 5 Last Round 2015 Fighting game Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One Enhanced version of Dead or Alive 5 Ultimate, featuring additional characters and stages.
Dissidia Final Fantasy NT Fighting game Arcade, PlayStation 4 Published by Square Enix.
Dead or Alive Xtreme 3 2016 Sports, party PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita Only released in Asia.
Nioh 2017 Action role-playing PlayStation 4, Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 5 Originally based on a script by Akira Kurosawa; PlayStation versions published by Sony Interactive Entertainment outside of Japan.
Dead or Alive Xtreme Venus Vacation Sports, party Microsoft Windows, macOS Steam version only released in specific Asia regions. DMM GAMES version only released in Japan.
Dissidia Final Fantasy Opera Omnia Role-playing Android, iOS Published by Square Enix.
Fire Emblem Warriors Action, hack and slash New Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch Co-developed with Omega Force.
Dead or Alive 6 2019 Fighting game PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Microsoft Windows
Dead or Alive Xtreme 3 Scarlet Sports, party PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch Only released in Asia.
Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order Action Nintendo Switch Published by Nintendo.
Nioh 2 2020 Action role-playing PlayStation 4, Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 5 PlayStation versions published by Sony Interactive Entertainment outside of Japan.
Ninja Gaiden: Master Collection 2021 Action-adventure, hack and slash PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One, Microsoft Windows A compilation of Ninja Gaiden Sigma, Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 and Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge.
Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin 2022 Action role-playing Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X/S Published by Square Enix.
Wo Long: Fallen Dynasty 2023 Action role-playing Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X/S
Atelier Resleriana: Forgotten Alchemy & the Liberator of Polar Night Role-playing Microsoft Windows, Android, iOS Co-developed with Gust and Akatsuki Games.[57][58]
Rise of the Rōnin 2024 Action role-playing, open-world PlayStation 5 Development assisted by Sony XDEV Studio. Published by Sony Interactive Entertainment.[59]

Cancelled games[edit]

  • Dead or Alive: Code Chronos - A prequel to the Dead or Alive series, which was going to focus on the backstory of Kasumi and Ayane, and reportedly was not going to be a fighting game. It was cancelled in November 2010.[60]
  • Project Progressive - A project that was originally planned for the Xbox, but its development moved to the Xbox 360. It was cancelled in November 2010.[60]
  • Ninja Gaiden 3DS - A Nintendo 3DS project announced by Team Ninja in 2011.[61] It was quietly cancelled at a later date.[62]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Icons: Dead or Alive.
  2. ^ "Video Games Daily | Tomonobu Itagaki: The Kikizo Interview 2005 with Team Ninja Boss". Archive.videogamesdaily.com. 2005-02-15. Archived from the original on 2016-03-19. Retrieved 2016-03-06.
  3. ^ a b "The History Of TECMO - Dead or Alive". YouTube. Retrieved 14 July 2023.
  4. ^ Edge staff (August 2002). "Inside... Tecmo". Edge. No. 113. Bath, England: Future Publishing. pp. 51–55. ISSN 1350-1593.
  5. ^ Sam Kennedy (1999-06-03). "Ninja Gaiden Goes PlayStation 2". GameSpot. Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  6. ^ "GameSpot's Month in Review for February 2004". GameSpot. March 2, 2004. Archived from the original on September 4, 2004.
  7. ^ Bettenhausen, Shane; Elliot, Shawn; Johnston, Chris (April 14 – May 1, 2004). "More like...Ninja Goddamn!". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Archived from the original on June 11, 2004. Retrieved April 14, 2010.
  8. ^ "Best and Worst of 2004". GameSpot. January 5, 2005. Archived from the original on March 7, 2005.
  9. ^ Brian Ashcraft. "Koei Tecmo Reveals Its New Company Logo (Looks Familiar)". Kotaku.com. Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  10. ^ "Tecmo: Declaration of Disbandment" (PDF). Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  11. ^ "Tecmo Koei: Declaration of Succession" (PDF). Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  12. ^ "TECMO KOEI HOLDINGS CO.,LTD. Announces Merger between Subsidiary and Sub-subsidiaries; Announces Business Transition between Subsidiaries". Reuters. 2023-02-11. Retrieved 2012-12-05.
  13. ^ "Tecmo Koei Just Sliced Up Team Ninja" (News). Kotaku. 25 March 2013. Retrieved 2012-12-05.
  14. ^ "Team Ninja splits into two groups following Tecmo Koei|restructuring" (News). Polygon. 26 March 2013.
  15. ^ Nelva, Giuseppe (2016-02-18). "Koei Tecmo Reorganizes into Multiple Brands, Aims to Be Top Dog in Entertainment Worldwide". DualShockers. Archived from the original on 2016-02-21. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  16. ^ Corriea, Alexa Ray (16 September 2016). "How Nioh Evolved from a JRPG to an Action Game". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 8 November 2016. Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  17. ^ Matulef, Jeffrey (30 September 2016). "Nioh director Fumihiko Yasuda on difficulty, player feedback and what's changing". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on 7 October 2016. Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  18. ^ a b c Espineli, Matt (21 January 2017). "Nioh Is A Brutal Return To Form For Ninja Gaiden Developer". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 28 January 2017. Retrieved 11 February 2023.
  19. ^ Corriea, Alexa Ray (16 September 2016). "How Nioh Evolved from a JRPG to an Action Game". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 8 November 2016. Retrieved 11 February 2023.
  20. ^ Matulef, Jeffrey (30 September 2016). "Nioh director Fumihiko Yasuda on difficulty, player feedback and what's changing". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on 7 October 2016. Retrieved 11 February 2023.
  21. ^ Devore, Jordan (11 December 2017). "Nominees for Destructoid's Best PS4 Game of 2017". Destructoid. Retrieved 14 July 2023.
  22. ^ "Best of 2017 Awards: Best PlayStation 4 Game". IGN. 20 December 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2023.
  23. ^ "Best of 2017 Awards: Best RPG". IGN. 20 December 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2023.
  24. ^ Brian (27 April 2018). "Famitsu Award 2017 winners announced". Nintendo Everything. Retrieved 14 July 2023.
  25. ^ "Nioh is the most successful game Koei Tecmo has ever published in the west". VG247. 30 March 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2023.
  26. ^ Makuch, Eddie (2021-10-01). "Stranger Of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin Release Date Announced, New Demo Out Now". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2021-10-01. Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  27. ^ a b Nelva, Giuseppe. "Koei Tecmo Teases Reveal of Games in The Works for Years That Will Show its "Full Power"". Twinfinite. Retrieved 27 June 2022.
  28. ^ a b Aubrey, Dave (30 March 2021). "Yaiba And Ninja Gaiden 3 "Weren't Right For The Series" According To Team Ninja's Fumihiko Yasuda". TheGamer. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  29. ^ Romano, Sal. "Bloodborne producer Masaaki Yamagiwa to leave Sony Interactive Entertainment JAPAN Studio at the end of February". Gematsu. Retrieved 11 February 2023.
  30. ^ Romano, Sal. "Bloodborne producer Masaaki Yamagiwa joins Team Ninja". Gematsu. Retrieved 11 February 2023.
  31. ^ Frank Caron (2007-12-06). "Itagaki sexual harassment case dead, not alive". arstechnica. Retrieved 2023-02-10.
  32. ^ Ashcroft, Brian (2008-06-23). "Itagaki Didn't Leave Tecmo, He Was Fired". Kotaku. Retrieved 2009-06-03.
  33. ^ Boyes, Emma (2008-06-17). "Report: More staff sue Tecmo". Gamespot UK. Retrieved 2008-06-18.
  34. ^ "Hands On: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Smash-Up" (News). The Escapist. 7 July 2009.
  35. ^ "板垣伴信氏とテクモの訴訟で和解が成立" (News) (in Japanese). Famitsu. 2 February 2010. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  36. ^ "游戏女神的人生故事(四)_网易游戏频道". Play.163.com (in Chinese). Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  37. ^ "Những nhân vật nữ nổi tiếng nhất trong làng game. Gamer Worlds - XãLuận.com Tin Nóng". Xaluan.com (in Vietnamese). 9 September 2010. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  38. ^ "Celebrity Death Match: Lara Croft Vs. The World | MTV UK". Mtv.co.uk. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  39. ^ Houghton, David (10 January 2010). "Are video games really sexist?". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  40. ^ a b David, Jenkins (25 November 2015). "Dead Or Alive Xtreme 3 cancelled in West because of sexism - Metro News". Metro.
  41. ^ Ashcraft, Brian (22 August 2012). ""Dead or Alive's Sexualized Females Aren't Going Anywhere". Kotaku. Retrieved 2023-07-22.
  42. ^ Rob, Crossley (November 25, 2015). "Dead or Alive Xtreme 3 Won't Ship Worldwide Due to Sexism Backlash Fears". GameSpot. Retrieved November 25, 2015.
  43. ^ "Dead or Alive Xtreme 3 Won't Ship Worldwide Due to Sexism Backlash Fears [UPDATE]". GameSpot.
  44. ^ "Dead Or Alive Xtreme 3 Not Coming West Due to Cultural Differences, Says Sony Boss - Niche Gamer". Niche Gamer. 15 December 2015.
  45. ^ Jakobs, Benjamin (May 13, 2008). "Ninja Gaiden 2: Keine Veröffentlichung in Deutschland vorgesehen" (in German). Retrieved 2023-07-14.Archived May 17, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  46. ^ "Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 will contain less violence". IGN. 2009-07-08. Archived from the original on 2009-07-12. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  47. ^ Jakobs, Benjamin (August 28, 2009). "Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2: Uncut und als CE" (in German). Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  48. ^ Hernandez, Pedro (20 May 2011). "Dead or Alive Dimensions Banned in Sweden". Nintendo World Report. Archived from the original on 25 May 2011. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  49. ^ Asher, Moses (20 May 2011). "Nintendo game banned after child porn concerns". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  50. ^ Bell, Alan (22 June 2011). "Dead or Alive: Dimensions - Re-Rated in Australia". NZGamer.com. Retrieved 2023-07-14.
  51. ^ "Evo Japan cuts inappropriate Dead or Alive 6 stream; co-founder issues apology". ESPN. 2019-02-15. Retrieved 2024-01-30.
  52. ^ "Japanese Dead or Alive 6 Stream Axed After Things Got a Bit Too Sexually Suggestive". Push Square. 2019-02-15. Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  53. ^ "EVO Japan 電競直播腰斬!DOA 女模搖胸拍臀有違賽會核心價值 - ezone.hk - 遊戲動漫 - 電玩遊戲". ezone.hk 即時科技生活. Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  54. ^ Chavez, Steven (2019-02-15). "EVO Japan 2019 stream cuts feed after lewd display during Dead or Alive 6 presentation, staff apologizes". EventHubs. Retrieved 2023-02-11.
  55. ^ Minotti, Mike (2020-07-02). "Evo 2020 cancelled in wake of sexual abuse allegations (Updated)". VB. Venture Beat. Retrieved 2020-07-02.
  56. ^ "Sony reportedly cancels Rise of the Ronin launch in South Korea". gamesindustry.biz. 13 February 2024. Retrieved 2024-02-22.
  57. ^ Torres, Josh. "Atelier Resleriana: Forgotten Alchemy and the Polar Night Liberator receives a western release in 2024". RPG Site. Retrieved 16 January 2024.
  58. ^ Nelva, Giuseppe (8 August 2023). "Atelier Resleriana Announced by Koei Tecmo for iOS, Android, & PC Via Steam". TechRaptor. Retrieved 16 January 2024.
  59. ^ Ivan, Tom. "Sony XDev is working with Team Ninja on Rise of the Ronin". VGC. Retrieved 20 September 2022.
  60. ^ a b Anoop Gantayat (November 5, 2010). "Team Ninja's Project Progressive and Dead or Alive Cronus Cancelled". Andriasang. Archived from the original on November 8, 2010. Retrieved July 9, 2022.
  61. ^ Spencer (11 July 2011). "What's Next For Team Ninja? The Short Answer Is Ni-Oh". Siliconera. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  62. ^ "Ninja Gaiden 3DS". IGN. Retrieved 23 February 2017.

External links[edit]