Ted Barris

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ted Barris
Ted Barris.jpg
Ted Barris appearing on November 5, 2013 as the guest speaker at the Oshawa Historical Society
Born (1949-07-12) July 12, 1949 (age 67)
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Occupation Author
Journalist
Educator
Broadcaster
Nationality Canadian
Notable awards Libris Award
Spouse Jayne MacAulay
Relatives Alex Barris (1923–2004) (father)
Website
tedbarris.com

Ted Barris (born July 12, 1949 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian writer, journalist, professor and broadcaster. He writes a weekly column, "The Barris Beat", and is a regular contributor to The Globe & Mail and The National Post. His non-fiction works focus on Canada's military heritage. Barris has authored 17 books.[1]

Early years[edit]

Barris was born in Toronto in 1949; his father, Alex Barris was a well-known Canadian author and broadcaster, and inspired his son's career in writing and broadcasting. In grade school, he wanted to become a writer with his first research for a term paper, "The Causes of the War of 1812", leading to his elementary school teacher (Mike Malott) encouraging him. Barris became interested in history and historical writing, a genre that would dominate his later writing career.

Writing career[edit]

While attending high school, Barris began his writing career. He contributed stories on school activities to the neighbourhood weekly, the Agincourt Mirror, and earned spending money. Barris graduated from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute’s three-year Radio and Television Arts program in 1971.[2]

Throughout his time at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, Barris had a part-time job at CJRT-FM, hosting the weekend all-night show. He also occasionally appeared on CBC Radio as a news reader. During this period, he began to explore documentary subjects, co-writing and co-producing half a dozen programs for CBC Radio’s weekend youth program, "Action Set".

Concentrating on a career in writing and broadcasting, in the 1970s, Barris wrote freelance music reviews for the Globe and Mail and other industry magazines, including Wingit, Pop and Grapevine. He also wrote for Canadian Composer, RPM Magazine, Rolling Stone (San Francisco), Film News and Country Sky. Barris considered a staff position with Warner Bros. Records but chose to work at the University of Saskatchewan, writing, directing and editing educational TV. A short documentary film he wrote and directed on noise pollution won the White Owl Conservation Award (Montreal) in 1973.

After returning to Ryerson University, Barris graduated in 1976 with a degree in the Bachelor of Applied Arts program. While in Saskatchewan, he completed the research that led to his first book, Fire Canoe: Prairie Steamboat Days Revisited, as well as to his decision to concentrate on a freelance career.

For the next two decades, Barris travelled throughout Canada on various assignments, alternately working for CBC Radio and National Public Radio, as well as appearing on television programs as host and broadcaster, while continuing his career in Canadian historical non-fiction. While residing in Alberta, Barris continued writing based on local subjects before beginning a number of books on military subjects, an area of speciality that now is the focus of his work.[1]

Barris is a professor of journalism at Toronto's Centennial College.[3] He resides in Uxbridge, Ontario. [4]

Awards[edit]

  • 2015 Certificate of Honor from Stalag Luft III Prisoners of War Association
  • 2014 Libris Award (Best Non-Fiction) (shared with Chris Hadfield)
  • 2006, Bear Hackle Award, by the 78th Fraser Highlanders (Canadian) Regiment [2]
  • 1993 Canada 125 Medal “For service to Canada and community.”

Selected bibliography[edit]

  • Fire Canoe: Prairie Steamboat Days Revisited 2nd Edition (1977)
  • The Great Escape: A Canadian Story (2013)
  • Victory at Vimy: Canada Comes of Age, April 9–12, 1917 (2007)
  • Juno: Canadians at D-Day June 6, 1944 (2004)
  • Deadlock in Korea : Canadians at War, 1950-1953 (1998)
  • Playing Overtime: A Celebration of Oldtimers Hockey (1995)
  • Days of Victory: Canadians Remember, 1939-1945 (1995)
  • Behind the Glory: Canada's Role in the Allied Air War (1992)
  • Fire Canoe: Prairie Steamboat Days Revisited (1977)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Guest: Ted Barris." TVO. Retrieved: April 23, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Member profile: Ted Barris." ""Writers Union of Canada. Retrieved: April 23, 2015.
  3. ^ "Professor Ted Barris shares Libris Award with astronaut Chris Hadfield." Centennial College, April 9, 2015. Retrieved: April 23, 2015.
  4. ^ Barris, Ted. "Twits and the Twiter-verse." The Barris Beat, 2015. Retrieved: April 23, 2015.

External links[edit]