Ted Goertzel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ted Goertzel
Conspiracy Panel at CSICON.jpg
Goertzel (left) with Dave Thomas, Bob Blaskiewicz and Scott Lilienfeld at the CSICon 2011 conspiracy theories panel.
Native name
Ted George Goertzel
Born (1942-11-20) November 20, 1942 (age 76)
EducationAntioch College (B.A., 1964), Washington University (M.A., 1966; Ph.D., 1970)
Known forResearch on conspiracy theories
ChildrenBen Goertzel, Rebecca Goertzel
Scientific career
FieldsSociology
InstitutionsRutgers University
ThesisBrazilian student attitudes towards politics and education (1970)

Ted George Goertzel (born November 20, 1942),[1] is an Emeritus Professor in the Sociology Department at Rutgers University in Camden, N.J. He is the author and co-author of books and articles spanning from social economy, politics, and conspiracy theories. He is the father of Ben Goertzel, with whom he co-authored the 1995 book Linus Pauling: A Life in Science and Politics, and of Rebecca Goertzel.[2][3]

Conspiracy theories[edit]

Being a social scientist, he studied conspiracy theories and conspiracy thinking in depth. One of his first studies on the subject started in 1992 with a telephone survey of 348 randomly chosen residents in southwestern New Jersey.[4] The survey was of 10 conspiracy theories circulating at that time. He concluded that anomie, insecurity, and lack of trust in people are positively correlated to conspiratorial thinking.[4][5][6] Moreover, people who believe in a conspiracy theory are more likely to believe in more than one.[5]

He is therefore considered an expert on rumors, including the Zika conspiracy theories,[7] ebola,[8] and moon landing conspiracies.[9]

Books[edit]

  • Brazil’s Lula: Rise and Fall of an Icon. Amazon Kindle Books 2018.
  • Presidential Leadership in the Americas Since Independence, by Guy Burton and Ted Goertzel. Lexington Publishers, October 2016
  • The End of the Beginning: Life, Society and Economy on the Brink of the Singularity. Ben Goertzel and Ted Goertzel, editors. Kindle Books 2014
  • The Drama of Brazilian Politics: From 1814-2015. Ted Goertzel and Paulo Roberto de Almeida, editors.
  • Brazil's Lula: The Most Popular Politician on Earth. Brown Walker Publishers, 2011.
  • Cradles of Eminence: Second Edition. Scottsdale, Arizona: Great Potential Press, 2003. By Victor and Mildred Goertzel, updated by Ted George Goertzel and Ariel M.W. Hansen.
  • Fernando Henrique Cardoso: Reinventing Democracy in Brazil. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1999.
  • Linus Pauling: A Life in Science and Politics. With Ben Goertzel, Mildred Goertzel and Victor Goertzel. New York: Basic Books, 1995.
  • Turncoats and True Believers: The Dynamics of Political Belief and Disillusionment. Buffalo: Prometheus Press, 1992.
  • Sociology: Class, Consciousness and Contradictions. With Albert Szymanski. New York: D. VanNostrand, 1979.
  • Three Hundred Eminent Personalities: A Psychosocial Analysis of the Famous. With Ariel Felton, Mildred Goertzel and Victor Goertzel. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1978.
  • Political Society. Chicago: Rand McNally, 1976.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ted George Goertzel". Library of Congress. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  2. ^ Paulos, John Allen (5 November 1995). "Pauling's Prizes". New York Times. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  3. ^ "Penn Goertzel Memorial". Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  4. ^ a b Goertzel, Ted (December 1994). "Belief in Conspiracy Theories". Political Psychology. 15 (4): 731. doi:10.2307/3791630.
  5. ^ a b Walker, Jesse (20 May 2014). "It's All a Conspiracy". Slate. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  6. ^ Bower, Bruce (26 May 2009). "The Inner Worlds of Conspiracy Believers". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  7. ^ Zhang, Sarah (18 February 2016). "Why People Want to Believe the Zika Virus Is a Conspiracy". Wired. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  8. ^ Bloch, Hannah. "Denying Ebola Turns Out To Be A Very Human Response". NPR. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  9. ^ Schwartz, John (14 July 2009). "Vocal Minority Insists It Was All Smoke and Mirrors". New York Times. Retrieved 6 June 2019.

External links[edit]