Ted Hopkins

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Ted Hopkins
Personal information
Full name Edward Hopkins
Date of birth (1949-05-27) 27 May 1949 (age 67)
Original team(s) Moe
Height / weight 177 cm / 68 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1968–1971 Carlton 29 (10)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1971.
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Edward "Ted" Hopkins (born 27 May 1949) is retired former Australian rules footballer, businessman and writer. He is most notable for his four-goal effort in the second half of Carlton's remarkable victory in the 1970 VFL Grand Final.

Football career[edit]

Hopkins, who came from Moe, played 29 senior games for the Carlton Football Club as a small rover.

Hopkins is most famous for his performance in Carlton's victory over Collingwood in the 1970 VFL Grand Final. Initially starting on the bench, Hopkins was substituted onto the ground as the 19th man for Bert Thornley at half-time. Within fifteen minutes, he had scored three goals, and assisted on another to Alex Jesaulenko – in a purple patch during which Carlton scored seven goals to erase Collingwood's 44-point half-time lead. He scored a fourth goal late in the final quarter, and Carlton would ultimately win the Grand Final by ten points.[1]

After the 1970 Grand Final, he played only one further game for Carlton before retiring from football to pursue other interests. He kicked a career total of 10 goals.[2]

Media career[edit]

Hopkins has written several pieces of published fiction and poetry. He has also been employed as a journalist, publisher and radio presenter. His current project is TedSport,[3] focussing on high-performance sports analysis. He was also co-founder of Champion Books, the Backyard Press Printing Co-operative, and Champion Data, a sports-statistics firm that concentrates on Australian Rules football.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Devaney, John. "Handball! Handball! Handball!". Australian Football. Retrieved 23 Aug 2011. 
  2. ^ Ted Hopkins: Blueseum.org
  3. ^ TedSport

External links[edit]