Ted Lepcio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ted Lepcio
Ted Lepcio.jpg
Infielder
Born: (1929-07-28) July 28, 1929 (age 87)
Utica, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 15, 1952, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 11, 1961, for the Minnesota Twins
MLB statistics
Batting average .245
Home runs 69
RBI 251
Teams

Thaddeus Stanley "Ted" Lepcio (born July 28, 1929, at Utica, New York) is an American former Major League Baseball utility infielder.[1]

Lepcio attended Seton Hall University. A one-time semiprofessional baseball player in Oneida, New York, he was signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1951. He played his first Major League game in 1952 and would play most of his professional career with the Red Sox, also appearing with the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago White Sox and Minnesota Twins. He was generally a utility infielder who could play second and third base or shortstop. His best year was 1956, when he hit 15 home runs, nine in an eighteen-day stretch.[1] Lepcio is mentioned in Jimmy Piersall's book, Fear Strikes Out, as his roommate during the stormy 1952 season, when Piersall had to be hospitalized with mental issues. Lepcio often saved Piersall from being beaten up by his own teammates.[2]

On July 13, 1961 Lepcio hit a grand slam in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians, which would turn out to be the deciding factor in the Twins' 9 to 6 victory.[3]

After he retired in 1961, Lepcio became a vice president with a New England trucking company. He also remained active in baseball and often chaired Red Sox events.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Career Statistics and History at Baseball-Reference.com
  2. ^ Piersall, Jimmy; Hirshberg, Al (1999). Fear strikes out: the Jim Piersall story. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press. p. 137. ISBN 0-8032-8761-5. Retrieved 31 August 2011. 
  3. ^ "Ted Lepcio's Grand Slam Sparks Twins' 9–6 Win". Hartford Courant. Associated Press. 14 July 1961. 
  4. ^ Thomas, Jack (14 April 2005). "A player in his day". Boston Globe. Retrieved 31 August 2011. 

External links[edit]