Ted Wass

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Ted Wass
Born Theodore Wass
(1952-10-27) October 27, 1952 (age 65)
Lakewood, Ohio, US
Occupation Actor, television director
Years active 1977–present
Spouse(s) Nina Wass (1996–present)
Janet Margolin (1979–1993) (her death)
Children 2

Theodore "Ted" Wass (born October 27, 1952) is an American television director and former actor. He is best known for his roles as Danny Dallas on the series Soap (1977–1981) and as Nick Russo on the NBC sitcom Blossom (1991–1995). Since Blossom ended its run in 1995, Wass has retired from acting and has focused only on directing episodic television such as Spin City, The Big Bang Theory, Less Than Perfect and 2 Broke Girls.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Wass was born in Lakewood, Ohio[1][2] (just west of Cleveland). He was raised in Glen Ellyn, Illinois (about 20 mi (32 km) west of Chicago) and graduated from Glenbard West High School there in 1970.[2][3] He attended DePaul University in Chicago, graduating from its Goodman School of Drama.[1]

Wass trained as an opera singer and was also involved in rock and roll as a lead singer and guitarist.[2]

Career[edit]

Acting[edit]

In 1976, Wass made his Broadway debut in the original Broadway production of Grease, playing Danny Zuko.[1]

He made his television debut as Danny Dallas on Soap opposite stage veteran Katherine Helmond from 1977-1981, filming 101 episodes.[1] He appeared on Broadway with his Soap co-star Diana Canova in Neil Simon's They're Playing Our Song.[4]

Wass starred in Curse of the Pink Panther (1983),[1] one of the post-Peter Sellers films in the franchise, as a detective engaged by Police Chief Dreyfus to track down Inspector Clouseau.[5]

He played struggling musician Bobby Shelton (who trades his soul — and his family — to become ill-fated rock star "Billy Wayne") in the black comedy film Oh, God! You Devil (1984). He played a sports journalist caught up in a murder in female-Tarzan film Sheena (1984), which received five nominations in the Razzie Awards.[6]

In 1986, he starred in TV movie Triplecross, directed by David Greene, in which he, Markie Post, and Gary Swanson are cops who receive a huge sum of money from a kidnap victim and become private detectives, competing against each other to solve cases.[7] This was intended as a pilot but the series was never picked up.

His last acting role was almost among his most prominent, playing the title character's father in Blossom (1991–1995), a sitcom about a teenage girl with two brothers being brought up by her single father.

Directing[edit]

Wass began directing while acting on the TV sitcom Blossom. Along with many TV movies, he has directed episodes of over 40 TV series.

Personal life[edit]

Wass' first wife was actress Janet Margolin, who died in December 1993 at age 50 from ovarian cancer.[2] Their two children are Julian (a composer) and Matilda.[2] His second wife is producer Nina Wass.[8]

Actor filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1977 Family Sam Trask Episode: "A Safe House"
1977 Handle with Care Cpl. Tillingham Television pilot
1977–1981 Soap (TV series) Danny Dallas Main cast (77 episodes)
1979 The Triangle Factory Fire Scandal Vinnie Television film
1979 The Thirteenth Day: The Story of Esther Simon Television special
1982 I Was a Mail Order Bride Robert Fitzgerald Television film
1983 Baby Sister David Mitchell Television film
1983 Curse of the Pink Panther Sgt. Clifton Sleigh Feature film
1984 Sheena Vic Casey Feature film
1984 Oh, God! You Devil Bobby Shelton Feature film
1985 Sins of the Father Gregory Scott Murchison Television film
1986 The Longshot Stump Feature film
1986 Triplecross Elliott Taffle Television film
1986 The Canterville Ghost Harry Canterville Television film
1986 Sunday Drive Paul Sheridan Television film (The Disney Sunday Movie)
1987 CBS Summer Playhouse Mickey Episode: "Mickey and Nora"
1988 Shades of Love: Sunset Court Dr. Jimmy Fielding Television film
1988 Pancho Barnes Frank Clake Television film
1989 Men (TV series) Dr. Steven Ratajkowski Main cast (6 episodes)
1989 Fine Gold Andre Feature film
1990 Sparks: The Price of Passion Steve Warner Television film
1991–1995 Blossom (TV series) Nick Russo Main cast (113 episodes)
1993 Triumph Over Disaster: The Hurricane Andrew Story Bryan Norcross Television film
1993 Danielle Steel's Star Ernie Television film

Director filmography[edit]

Year Title Type Notes
Blossom TV series 18 episodes
Local Heroes TV series
Coach TV series 1 episode
Mr. Rhodes TV series 6 episodes
The Jeff Foxworthy Show TV series 13 episodes
Jenny TV series 1 episode
Smart Guy TV series 5 episodes
Soul Man TV series
The Secret Lives of Men TV series
Costello TV series 1 episode
1998–99 Caroline in the City TV series 17 episodes
1999 Two of a Kind TV series 1 episode
Oh, Grow Up TV series
Norm TV series 1 episode
Stark Raving Mad TV series
Then Came You TV series
Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place TV series
My Wife and Kids TV series
2000–2002 Spin City TV series
My Adventures in Television TV series
Regular Joe TV series
Married to the Kellys TV series
I'm with Her TV series
2002–2006 Less Than Perfect TV series
2006 Crumbs TV series 10 episodes
2006 The Game TV series 2 episodes
2006 'Til Death TV series
2007–2013 Rules of Engagement TV series 45 episodes
2007 The Big Bang Theory TV series
2007 Two and a Half Men TV series
Gary Unmarried TV series
2007–2008 Everybody Hates Chris TV series
Scrubs TV series
2009 Ruby & the Rockits TV series
2009 Brothers TV series
2010 Accidentally on Purpose TV series
$#*! My Dad Says TV series
2010 Melissa & Joey TV series 9 episodes
2011 State of Georgia TV series 5 episodes
2011–12 2 Broke Girls TV series 9 episodes
2012 Sullivan & Son TV series 3 episodes
2013 Dads TV series 2 episodes
2014— Undateable TV series
2013–14 Last Man Standing TV series
2014–2015 Mom TV series 16 episodes
2015 Cristela TV series
2015 Truth Be Told TV series
2016 The Odd Couple TV series

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Lights shine on The Theatre School gala honorees". newsline.depaul.edu. DePaul University. March 29, 2012. Archived from the original on March 9, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Cavazos, Norma (November 20, 1994). "TV Questions". The News-Press. Fort Myers, Florida. Knight-Ridder News Service. p. 168. Retrieved November 22, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  3. ^ "History". glenbard1958. Glenbard High School Class of 1958. 
  4. ^ "Ted Wass". IBDB.com. Internet Broadway Database. Retrieved November 22, 2017. 
  5. ^ Brunsdale, Mitzi M. (2010). Icons of Mystery and Crime Detection: From Sleuths to Superheroes. ABC-CLIO. p. 184. 
  6. ^ Wilson, Staci Layne (2007). Animal Movies Guide. p. 18. 
  7. ^ Roberts, Jerry (2009). "David Greene". Encyclopedia of Television Film Directors. Scarecrow Press. p. 215. ISBN 9780810863781. 
  8. ^ "Ted Wass Biography (1952-)". FilmReference.com. 

External links[edit]